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Deportivo FAS
bruger
12. juli 2012 13:59
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

FĂžrste finale kamp i Colombia blev spillet i nat hvor Deportivo Pasto mĂždte independiente Santa Fe fra BogotĂĄ.

Nyoprykkede Deportivo Pasto havde i sin semifinale pulje overraskende elimineret favoritterne fra Deportivo Cali, Deportivo Tolima Atletico Huila, mens hovedstadsholdet havde vÊret langt mere suverÊn i sin semifinalepulje som udover Santa Fe havde bestÄet af la Equidad, Chico Boyacå og Itagui.

FĂžrste kamp blev spillet pĂ„ Pasto´s bane Estadio Libertad. hjemmeholdet tog fĂžring ved midtabenespilleren Kevin RendĂłn pĂ„ frispark efter smĂ„ 25 minutters spil - backen Juli+an Quiñónez udlignede for gĂŠsterne kort fĂžr pausen - og gav El Expresso Rojo alle tiders mulighed for at hente deres fĂžrste mesterskab siden 1975, nĂ„r der er retur kamp pĂ„ Estadio Nemesio Camacho "El CampĂ­n" - lĂžrdag.

https://www.youtube.com/
LRnXoGPflJo
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > SĂ€o Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
KayOkay
bruger
12. juli 2012 19:02
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

jeg skulle nok havde spillet pÄ gÄrsdagens kamp :-)
Deportivo FAS
bruger
12. juli 2012 23:23
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Ja den mÄ have givet godt - og sÄ pÄ udebane.

apropos Brasilien sÄ ser det ud til Oscar er pÄ vej til Chelsea for 25 Millioner Euro, det harmonere bare lidt dÄrligt med forlans udtalelser om internacionals muligheder for at vinde Brasileirão ?

Og sĂ„ lidt colombianske nyheder...Andib har berĂžrt Jackson "Cha cha cha" MartĂ­nez skifte til Porto, endvidere mere jeg at Kayokay var inde pĂ„ Dorlan PabĂłn, "memin" blandt hans fans da de mener han har tegneserie figuren Roadrunner´s acceleration. Han skifter Atletico Nacional ud med Italienske Parma. Den sidste colombianer har ogsĂ„ forladt Racing Club i Argentina - fĂžrst Teo GutiĂ©rrez i lĂžbet af sĂŠson grundet adfĂŠrdsproblemer og nu den offensive Midtbanespiller Giovanni Moreno, som har haft en del skader i sĂŠsonen lĂžb - han slutter sig til Anelka og Drogba i Shanghai Shenhua.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > SĂ€o Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
Deportivo FAS
bruger
12. juli 2012 23:58
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Vi har vÊret lidt inde pÄ det fÞr i forbindelse med brasiliansk klubfodbold -faldt over den her artikel om Flamengos problemer pt (er pÄ engelsk)


Slipped, Dissolved and Loosed – The Moral Bankruptcy of Flamengo

Written by James Young

Murder. Machine guns. R$40 million IOUs. Mysteriously disappearing blood samples. Barack Obama. Creaky hotel floorboards. ´Th’ whole worl’s in a terrible state o’chassis,´ said Captain Boyle in Sean O’Casey’s Juno and the Paycock, but it is a sane and well-ordered place compared with the recent history of Brazil’s biggest club, Flamengo.

It is hard to pinpoint exactly when the rot set in. At the end of 2009 things looked rosy enough. Flamengo had just won their first Campeonato Brasileiro since 1992, under former player turned coach, Andrade. Yet it was not the kind of triumph from which a dynasty might spring. This was an ageing, somewhat cobbled together side, led by 36 year-old Serbian playmaker Petkovic and the goals of Adriano, who would leave the club for Roma in the following June.

Even more so than many recent BrasileirĂŁo seasons, 2009 ended in a rather unseemly stumble over the finishing line. Flamengo won the title on the last day, courtesy of a late Angelim winner over GrĂȘmio. A seething throng of 85,000 packed the MaracanĂŁ to watch it.

But change was coming. The day after the GrĂȘmio game, with the bubbles still fizzing from the popped champagne bottles, Patricia Amorim, a former champion with Flamengo’s swimming club, was elected president. A few months later, Andrade and Vice President of Football Marcos Braz were fired, just after the club had qualified for the last 16 of the Libertadores (Flamengo would go on to beat Corinthians before falling to Universidad de Chile in the quarter-finals).

Since then a succession of coaches, including Silas, Vanderlei Luxemburgo, and now, Joel Santana, have tried and failed to recapture the success of 2009. In 2010, Flamengo finished 14th, only two points off the relegation zone, before recovering enough last year to clinch a Libertadores spot. Although the club boasts a raft of talented youngsters, such as volantes Luiz Antonio and Muralha,and midfielders Thomas and Adryan, plus the goals of Vagner Love, expectations for this season’s Serie A campaign are not particularly high.

Instead, it is in the less salubrious area of off-field scandal that Flamengo have excelled. Twisting Franny Lee’s maxim about cups for cock-ups just a little, if there was a campeonato for calamity then the Gávea would be heaving with shiny pots.

Some foreshadowing of what was to come had surfaced in 2008, when a story broke that a number of players, including midfielder Marcinho and striker Diego Tardelli, had been partying with prostitutes at goalkeeper Bruno’s Minas Gerais country home. That afternoon ended with Marcinho allegedly assaulting one of the women, and the player left the club soon after.

Then, in 2010, Adriano, who was already on his way to Roma, was caught on camera posing with the (allegedly replica) machine gun of a traficante acquaintance in a Rio favela. Around the same time, Vagner Love, who would join the club in 2012, was filmed partying in similarly dubious, gun-toting company.

Worse by far came to light a few weeks later, when details of the (still unproven) murder of Eliza Samudio broke. Goalkeeper Bruno was arrested and charged with involvement in the murder of the young woman, with whom he had fathered a child, and the player remains in prison awaiting trial.

While none of the club’s directors have gone as far as to be accused with murder, a look behind the scenes during the same period makes grim reading. In recent years, Flamengo have been riven by backstage power games and bloodletting. Club legend Zico could stand only four months as chief executive in that chaotic year of 2010, saying that ´today’s Flamengo has died in my heart, represented by people that I’ve never even met, but that walk around as if they owned the club.´

His current job training the Iraqi national team must seem idyllic by comparison. Virulent internal politics have become a staple of life at Flamengo, illustrated by the imbroglio that surrounded Vanderlei Luxemburgo’s exit from the club earlier this year.

Caught in the middle of a feud between financial director Michel Levy and Amorim, Luxemburgo demanded that Ronaldinho, in a miserable run of form, be sacked after the player was caught on camera visiting the hotel room of a female chum at the club’s pre-Libertadores training camp. Instead, it was Luxemburgo who lost his job, as player-power won out in Brazil once more.

With hindsight, it is a decision Flamengo might like to undo. The club is deep in the financial mire and the situation has worsened with the Brazilian courts’ relatively new found enthusiasm for ensuring that workers’ contracts are enforced. At the time of writing, Flamengo are on the potential hook for a combined R$85 million from the contracts of just four players (Romario, Ronaldinho, Petkovic and Paraguayan Zagueiro Gamarra). The club’s 2011 balance sheet revealed debts of around half a billion reais.

To make matters worse, Flamengo’s income stream from player sales has dried up, while crowds have tumbled dramatically during the closure of the Maracanã for World Cup rebuilding work. At the same time, ludicrously, the club has gone without a principal shirt sponsor since the beginning of this year.

In this context, accepting full responsibility for Ronaldinho’s contractual payments - a large chunk of which had previously been the obligation of sports management company Traffic - at the end of 2011 might have seemed a noble gesture, but it quickly became evident that making those payments would prove impossible, and Ronaldinho went months without receiving his wages and valuable image rights payments.

Coupled with the player’s limp on-field displays, something had to give. As usual, the crisis was handled with in a particularly cack-handed manner. When Ronaldinho declined to travel to the north eastern state of Piauí for a friendly in May, director Paulo Cesar Coutinho bragged to a group of fans that the star was finished at the club. He was right. The next day, Ronaldinho’s lawyers obtained a court order cancelling the player’s contract, and announced plans to sue Flamengo for R$40 million.

The fun was just beginning. Threatening retaliation, Flamengo legal director Rafael de Piro stated that the club was in possession of a legal “bomb” in the form of a blood test showing that Ronaldinho had recently turned up drunk for training. A few days later, Amorim announced that the blood sample had ´gone missing´. A day or so after that, Flamengo medical chief JosĂ© Luiz Runco stated that no such blood test existed, and that neither he nor his team had ever been asked to take one. Flamengo have since dropped their claim, while Ronaldinho’s agent and brother, Assis, is threatening further legal action, this time for moral damages.

It is a staggering list of mishaps. And throughout it all, the club’s leadership, instead of attempting to implement any kind of long term, sustainable development plan, has lurched blindly from one disaster to another.

When the Ronaldinho storm was still brewing, and with Vagner Love already ensconced at the GĂĄvea, Flamengo were recently first in line to sign another seemingly disillusioned, chaos-courting star - Adriano. Not much consideration, it seems, was given to the fact that the player is unlikely to ever recover his fitness or form, the damaging effect he may have on team spirit and impressionable younger players, or the unwelcome headlines his off-field antics might attract. Damaged or not, Adriano is big box office, and so, runs the thinking, is exactly the kind of player Flamengo need.

The klaxon-mouthed, ill-considered behaviour that marked the Ronaldinho debacle runs throughout the club, from Amorim down. The club president is a dichotomy – on one level a strong, intelligent woman who has had to overcome a great many obstacles to succeed in a male dominated world, and who has at least demonstrated the will, if not the means, to reform the club. But at the same time she possesses the same unfortunate talent for self-aggrandising marketing stunts and tribalism as her male counterparts, usually at the expense of clear, practical thinking.

When Barack Obama visited Rio, there was Patricia, thrusting a Flamengo shirt into the bewildered President’s hands, so she could boast that Barack was Flamenguista. When Ronaldinho was unveiled in front of 25,000 screaming fans, there was Patricia on the stage beside him, clad in a team shirt, punching the air. Whenever the club’s basketball or volleyball teams win a trophy, Patricia is there, basking in the glory.

Yet her mandate has included a drastic worsening of the club’s financial situation, countless off-field scandals, little footballing success, and now the Ronaldinho debacle. In many ways, Flamengo resembles what might happen if a group of primary school children were told to organise a football club – a lot of shouting, little sense of order, and nobody really in command.

Which is where the question of morality comes in. A club that is idolised by millions of Brazilians has an important role to play in Brazilian society (which needs all the positive role models it can get). Perhaps it seems naĂŻve to say it, but Flamengo can, and should, be an example to many. Aim above morality. ´Be not simply good, be good for something,´ as Henry David Thoreau put it. Instead, senior Flamengo officials, from the president down, bicker and snarl in public, engage in cheap oneupmanship with rivals, play fast and loose with their legal obligations, and, on at least one occasion (Ronaldinho’s blood test, for example), display an impressive disregard for the truth. All of which make for an unedifying spectacle.

If Flamengo is to one day to return to its former glory, progress on the pitch will be only half the battle. For that glory to be more than fleeting, then the thinking of the club’s leadership, if not the leadership itself, will need to change.




Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > SĂ€o Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
Deportivo FAS
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13. juli 2012 00:26
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Og sÞrme sÄ - en vintage retro blog for de gamle drenge og fans af sydamerikansk fodbold....enjoy Muchachos :-)


América de Cali: From Curses, Copas And Cocaine To Clinton, Crisis And Collapse

Written by Simon Edwards and Harold Palacio.

The rise and fall of America de Cali encapsulates the turmoil of the last four decades in Colombia. The club was able to reach new highs as the influx of drug money in the 1980s swelled the pockets of club owners. However, the money came and went, and the Red Devils have since suffered the implications of their former mafia connections. United States policies crippled the club financially and after ten years of struggle, the team´s humbling collapse came in 2011 as they were relegated to the second tier of Colombian football.

The club was officially founded on 13th February 1927, taking the name AmĂ©rica from a successful youth side formed by school children a decade before. The club built upon the youth teams success and won four amateur championships in quick succession. Humberto Salcedo FernĂĄndez became club chairman 1948 and took immediate steps to professionalise the sides operations. Benjamin Urrea, a local dentist and passionate AmĂ©rica fan, took exception to the new owners ambitious plans and publicly put a curse on the club. The fan, better known as "Garabato", announced "if the team is professionalised, I swear to God it will never be champion". Many superstitious fans of the Red Devils breathed a sigh of relief in 1979 as the club defied Señor Urrea´s warning by winning the league championship. However, others remain convinced that Garabato´s in-bittered smite continues to plague the club, as they have been beaten in all four of their Copa Libertadores finals since.

Gabriel Ochoa Uribe was appointed coach in 1979 and brought immediate success to the club. Within a year Ochoa had led América de Cali to its first ever Colombian championship, overcoming a strong Unión Magdelena side in their final fixture. The club went on to win an unprecedented five consecutive Primera A championships between 1982 and 1986.

As cocaine became the drug of choice for the rich and famous in the United States, the small number of Colombian gangs who oversaw production and controlled trafficking routes amassed a huge amount of wealth. The Cali Cartel was led by JosĂ© Santacruz Londoño and the RodrĂ­guez Orejuela brothers Gilberto and Miguel. The group originally focussed on kidnapping, but then moved to trafficking marijuana, and associate Helmer "Pacho" Herrera moved to New York to create a distribution network. The group moved to trafficking cocaine in the late 1970´s. With Pacho´s New York connections and the RodrĂ­guez brothers ruthless use of violence, the group, which became the Cali Cartel, were able to oversee cocaine production and control the trafficking routes throughout the south of the country. Through bribery and the threat of violence the RodrĂ­guez brothers became untouchable in the city. The brothers poured huge amounts of illegally earned cash into the Cali club. By investing in the city´s working-class club the pair successfully developed their support and connection to those living within the city´s poorer neighbourhoods. Throughout the 1980´s the Cali Cartel was engaged in a bitter rivalry with the MedellĂ­n Cartel to the north. While AmĂ©rica de Cali received money from the RodrĂ­guez brothers, AtlĂ©tico Nacional was heavily back by the MedellĂ­n Cartel´s Pablo Escobar. JosĂ© Gonzalo RodrĂ­guez Pacho, alias "El Mexicano" and also of the MedellĂ­n Cartel, became the owner of BogotĂĄ club Millonarios. Personal and competitive rivalries between the Cartels were played out in proxy on the football field.

The influx of money allowed América de Cali to attract international stars and create an exciting, attacking side. The Red Devils signed Willington Ortiz from bitter rivals Deportivo Cali, as well as Peruvian World Cup stars Guillermo La Rosa and César Cueto (Andib ;-)) , Paraguayan striker Roberto Cabañas and Argentine international goalkeeper Julio César Falcioni. The side played exciting, fast-paced football; with two attacking midfielders and a front three who became known "los tres fantasticos", consisting of Antonio Gareca, Juan Manuel Battaglia and Roberto Cabañas. Gareca was dubbed "the six million dollar man" by Cali fans, as club officials allegedly demanded this fee from any foreign clubs interested in signing their star player. Over lunch in 1979 Miguel Rodríguez is said to have offered a 20 year old Diego Maradona $3 million to play the remainder of the season for América de Cali. Maradona is reported to have accepted the offer, before his club manager at Argentinos Juniors scuppered the deal by revealing an agreement had already been reached with Barcelona.

Despite the club´s incredible domestic success, the goal of continental silverware was never achieved. Reflecting on this, star striker Willington Oritz noted "winning the league doesn´t compensate, the team was put together to win the Copa Libertadores". In 1985 the club were denied on penalties after trading 1-0 victories with Argentinos Juniors. In the penalty shoot-out the first nine spot kicks were converted, and goalkeeper Falcioni was set to take the potentially decisive fifth kick for the devils. Falcioni buckled under the immense pressure and responsibility was passed to 20 year old striker Antony de Avila. Known as "The Smurf", 5 foot 2 inch de Avila was thrown into a terrifying situation and missed from twelve yards as AmĂ©rica were denied. The following year AmĂ©rica again made the final, but were beaten 3-1 over two legs by Boca Juniors.

While América de Cali dominated domestic football and frequently beat their great rivals Atlético Nacional, they never achieved their ultimate goal of Libertadores success. This frustration was soured further as Atlético Nacional won the trophy in 1989 in their first appearance in the final and Pablo Escobar was photographed holding the trophy as he boarded his private jet.

As the 1980´s ended drug related violence continued to spiral out of control within Colombia and beyond. Throughout the 1980´s the drug cartels operated in Colombia with very little opposition. The cartels offered officials two options; they could either accept a generous bribe, or refuse and face the violent consequences for themselves and their families. Very few refused the offer, and thousands of state officials became involved and implicated in the cartels´ criminal activities as a result. In 1989 presidential candidate Luis Carlos GalĂĄn publicly criticised the violence and criminality of the cartels. GalĂĄn received widespread public support for his campaign, and was the favourite to win the 1989 election before he was gunned down during a public address. The drug cartels no longer had a free reign in Colombia and the United States began to enthusiastically support efforts to bring those involved to justice. Cocaine consumption in the United States was on the increase and the huge influx of crack cocaine as a cheaper alternative had brought with it thousands of new addicts in poorer neighbourhoods. Drug related crime in the US rose steadily, and the US Drug Enforcement Agency switched their efforts from combating heroin to cocaine, with Colombia the new focus of their operations.

In 1993 Pablo Escobar was shot and killed on a MedellĂ­n rooftop in a combined effort between Colombian and US officials, with alleged support from right-wing paramilitaries and a group supported by the Cali Cartel called Los Pepes. While the Cali Cartel outlived Escobar´s MedellĂ­n Cartel, the tide had changed, and in 1995 six of the heads of the Cali Cartel were arrested. Those who profited from cocaine could no longer flaunt their wealth in such a public fashion and club finances were increasingly scrutinised.

Despite the loss of their infamous and extravagant financial backers, AmĂ©rica continued to enjoy on-the-field success into the 90´s. They won the Colombian championship in 1990, 1992, 1997, 2000 and 2001. In 1996 IFFHS ranked AmĂ©rica de Cali as the second best club side in the world, only beaten by Italian champions Juventus. The same organisation ranked the Red Devils as the 35th best club side of all time in 1999. In 1996 they got to yet another Copa Libertadores final, but were again denied by Argentine opposition. The Colombian side led after the first leg of the final, as Antony de Avila scored an excellent chip from a tight angle to give AmĂ©rica the advantage. The Smurf had come a long way since his 1985 disappointment, becoming the club´s record goalscorer and most capped player. However, in the second leg it was Colombian international goalkeeper Oscar Cordoba who would become the villain as AmĂ©rica again fell at the final hurdle. With the ball rolling out for an AmĂ©rica goal kick Cordoba inexplicably rushed to clear. With the keeper out of position Boca quickly whipped a cross into the box for HernĂĄn Crespo to head into an empty net. Crespo later scored a second to once again deny the Cali side. Bemused by his decision, Cordoba explained how "only now I can think about it ... I guess the thing I´ve learnt most in my career is to save the ones that are going in and leave the ones that aren´t".

At the turn of the millennium the Cali side finally picked up their first international silverware, as the club beat BogotĂĄ rivals Santa Fe on penalties to win the 1999 Copa Mercanorte, the competition which was later rebranded the Copa Suramericana in 2002.

While the side continued to enjoy footballing success, they also faced new crippling financial challenges. CorporaciĂłn Deportivo AmĂ©rica was investigated as part of Executive Order 12978, commonly known as the Clinton List in Colombia. As a result of previous connections to the RodrĂ­guez family all of the club´s US based assets, valued at around US$1 million, were seized, and the all companies which had connections to AmĂ©rica de Cali were prevented from legally operating in the United States. This meant that no sponsorship deals could be signed and the club relied solely on ticket revenue and merchandise sales to cover its costs. Furthermore, club president Carlos Puente insists the AmĂ©rica was also denied the $200,000 prize money they were due for winning the Copa Mercanorte in 1999. In 2010 the club finally managed to escape the limitations imposed by the Clinton list. The club was restructured with the support of local government, and was able to change the name of the holding company without giving up the team name, trophies or physical assets. Despite this, the club still has over $US2 million of debt and player salaries have been limited to a maximum of US$3,000 a week or US$36,000 a year. The side can not compete with the wages offered by rival Colombian clubs, let alone those available in wealthier leagues to the north and the south.

AmĂ©rica has become a selling club, and over the last ten years they have repeatedly lost their strongest players. While this is a common phenomenon in Colombian football, their limited funds means they have no way of attracting talented replacements. Any money generated is used to keep the club afloat and maintain debt repayments. It is not unusual in Colombia for a club to have an unbeatable attacking side one year and a toothless disappointment the next. The Colombian league structure accommodates clubs´ inconsistency, and relegations are decided by the total points of each side over three years. The bottom club is then relegated and replaced by the best placed Primera B side. The team who finishes in the second lowest position over three years then meets the second highest placed Primera B side over two legs, with the winner participating in Primera A the following year. The decisive second leg is played at the home ground of the current Primera A side, giving them the advantage. The league´s organisers hope that this will keep the country´s most popular sides in the top division.

After a successful 2008, AmĂ©rica de Cali´s point totals dropped significantly and failed to improve substantially for six consecutive seasons. This is in sharp contrast to other sides in the league. Independiente MedellĂ­n had a disastrous first half of 2009, but rebuilt their team and went on to win the title in the second half of the year. AmĂ©rica de Cali´s limited funds have meant they have failed to replace their most valuable players, and their league form has suffered as a result.

Despite the club´s prolonged decline, nobody expected that they would be beaten by minnows Patriotas de BoyacĂĄ over two legs. The first leg finished 1-1, but AmĂ©rica de Cali remained confident they would be able to pick up the home win which would keep them in the league. The home side took the lead just after half time, but Patriotas snatched an equalizer mid-way through the second half and held on to take the game to penalties after 180 minutes. AmĂ©rica fell behind in the shoot-out, but were able to draw level with one penalty each remaining. With the game finely balanced, club captain Jersson Gonzalez stepped up for AmĂ©rica. The 36 year old full-back, never looked confident as he took a short run up and side footed his penalty low to the keepers right. He beat Carlos Chavez in the Patriotas goal, but he also hit the post. As the ball ricocheted away he looked stunned. Motionless he looked up at the packed crowd behind the goal, before the powerful defender broke into tears as he realised the implications of his error. The Patriota goalkeeper then calmly stepped up, blasted the ball into the top corner and turned around with an apologetic look, before being was engulfed by jubilant team-mates. The unthinkable had happened, and shell-shocked AmĂ©rica fans vented their frustration after the whistle. They squared-off against police in the stadium, before rioting in the streets surrounding the ground.

Last night America de Cali celebrated their 85 year anniversary with fireworks, music, and a procession of former players and silverware in front of a packed crowd of the 35,000. The fans were then treated to a polished, albeit scrappy, 2-0 win to take the home side joint top in the league. All went to plan, and those in attendance went home happy. The evening acted as a reminder of the club´s great history and passionate support. AmĂ©rica are still a huge club, and they are still able to attract some of the largest attendances in Colombia. Relegation has been costly, but it may give the Red Devils time to restructure the club and concentrate on creating the foundations for a more sustainable future. Away from the intense pressure of Primera A, AmĂ©rica now have time to nurture young talent within a competitive environment and return the focus to what remains great about the club. AmĂ©rica de Cali have some of the most passionate fans in the league and I hope the Red Devils can return to the Primera A, resurgent and with a new focus.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > SĂ€o Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ

Dette indlĂŠg er blevet rettet 13. juli 2012 00:27 af Deportivo FAS
Deportivo FAS
bruger
13. juli 2012 10:18
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

sÄ er der lidt mere sommerlÊsning om colombiansk fodbold - Denne gang om talentfabrikkeni colombiansk fodbold Envigado FC.

OBS En del af de névnte spillere har som tidligere névnt skiftet klub - Moreno til Shanghai Shenshua, Pabon til Parma, Fredy Guarín til Inter - men jeg mener at "Sydamerikas Cristiano Ronaldo" - James Rodriguez i skrivende stund stadigvék spiller i Porto, selvom Man United skulle vére interesseret i ham... http://www.dailymail.co.
ntract.html


Envigado FC: Producing The Future Of Colombian Football In The Shadows Of Giants

Written by Simon Edwards

In MedellĂ­n you can tell a lot about a person by the colour of the shirt they wear. On the day of the clasico the city becomes divided between the green and white of Atletico Nacional and the red and blue of Independiente MedellĂ­n. For most people their team is decided by their neighbourhood, family, and social status. Atletico Nacional fans are proud of the team´s illustrious history, greater international prestige and larger fan-base. On the other hand, Independiente MedellĂ­n´s devoted backers take pride in their recent domestic and international successes, celebrating their underdog status and revelling in upsetting their wealthier neighbours. Footballing allegiances in MedellĂ­n are about a lot more than football; they are often indicative of social status, identity and aspiration. To align oneself with the red and blue of MedellĂ­n is to celebrate the identity of difference, to champion the underdog and to passionately resist the cities dominant forces, whereas those who wear green and white emphasize the club´s greater size and success; los verdes take pride in their great tradition. Nacional embody the city´s aspiration while MedellĂ­n represents defiance and independence.

On match day the teams´ respective barra brava´s orchestrate proceedings at either end of the 45,000 seater stadium shared by the clubs, with Nacional to the south and MedellĂ­n to the north; an approximate reflection of support within the city. For large parts of the game, for the fans, the action on the field becomes secondary to representing the club and the hincha; producing the greater spectacle and out-chanting the opposing end of the stadium. Banners are unveiled, streams of paper are distributed, flares lit and drummers prepared with military precision by marijuana-smoking, bare-chested youngsters. The police, who congregate in groups of three or four close to the exits, do their best to avoid eye contact and further inflame the impassioned hordes. The two great teams in the city are a source of pride and identity for the people of MedellĂ­n.

So, what then for Envigado FĂștbol Club?

The club was founded in 1989 and moved to the newly constructed Estadio Polideportivo Sur in 1992. Envigado is a municipality within the Area Metropolitana del Valle Aburra to the south of MedellĂ­n, with a population of around 180,000 residents. Envigado is almost indistinguishable from its sprawling neighbour to the north, as you travel south from Poblado the traffic lights provide the only indication that you have entered a separate municipality; painted black and white in MedellĂ­n and yellow in Envigado. Envigado is most famous for lying at the heart of MedellĂ­n´s drug trafficking operations. The heavy presence of armed groups in the municipality results in a fraught yet sustained peace, interrupted by infrequent moments of terrible violence. The club itself has suffered directly from such episodes. Former head coach Gustavo Upegui Lopez was killed whilst allegedly resisting a kidnapping attempt in 2006 and 19 year old midfielder Luis Eduardo Estrada Saldarriaga was shot and killed in 2008. While the potential for outbreaks of violence remains in the city, such instances are now relatively infrequent. The clubs ground is located towards the south of the city close to the Envigado´s major metro station. They were promoted to the top tier of Colombian football in 2005 but were relegated the following season. The team bounced back and returned to Primera A in 2007 where they have remained to this day.

Despite the team´s excellent results, free-flowing attacking football and incredible rise, their fan-base remains minuscule when compared to that of their neighbours. Envigado finished higher in last seasons league standings than either AtlĂ©tico Nacional or Independiente MedellĂ­n, and yet it is a club treated with scorn or indifference by the majority of Antioqueños. The club lacks the history, prestige or size of their local rivals and are therefore dismissed as irrelevant. Furthermore, as a new club the team does not embody a particular ideology. Nacional and MedellĂ­n are clubs with an identity and association which is passed down through generations and spread within local communities. Envigado, on the other hand, seem to garner their support from the apathetic, disillusioned and a core of die hard fans who are passionate about the independence of their small city. The club´s hardcore fans are known as pasiĂłn naranja and they are undoubtedly as committed those of either of their neighbours to the north. However, rather than directing and animating a sea of supporters, they more often than not account for the majority of those present at home games. I worked in Envigado for a year and I have met hundreds of Envigadeños, and yet only a dozen or so fans of the club.

So, despite all of the local indifference why is this small town club so important for the future of Colombian football? Well, while they may not attract much attention, the products of their youth academy certainly do. In the last ten years the club has produced more current Colombian internationals than any other side in the league. Some of Colombia´s most talented players have made their began their careers Envigado in recent years, while seven of the members of the national team made their professional debuts for the club. Internationals such as Giovanni Moreno, Dorlan PabĂłn, James RodrĂ­guez, Fredy GuarĂ­n, Mauricio Molino, Jairo Palomino, Gabriel GĂłmez, Gustavo BolĂ­var and Gerado Vallejo all got their first break at the tiny Estadio Polideportivo. The club continue to exceed expectations on a small budget and have recently produced some of the stars of Colombia´s successful under-20 side. The current sides young stars include prolific striker John CĂłrdoba and talented midfielder YuliĂĄn MejĂ­a, while last season´s star player Juan Fernando Quintero recently completed a move to AtlĂ©tico Nacional.

Envigado FĂștbol Club has made incredible strides since its formation in 1989. In recent seasons the side has consistently finished in the top half of the table, despite losing their strongest players at the end of each campaign, and this year they will represent Colombia in the Copa Sudamericana. The club will have to win titles to gain the respect of this football loving country for whom success is counted in estrellas. However, if the club continue to produce such exceptionally talented players there is no doubt that their young side may one day be able to realise this dream. That said, and despite the positives, without a distinct identity and local recognition the orange-clad Envigado fans will continue to be a rare sight around the town. So, while I may be del verde and feliz, I urge you to back Envigado´s stylish young underdogs. Nacional may be tu papa but it is Envigado who are producing the exciting young talents who are making Colombian football a potential international force.

Giovanni Moreno

Currently of Racing in Argentina, Moreno made his professional debut for Envigado in 2006 at the age of 18. He played for the side 59 times and scored 24 goals, leading the club to promotion in 2007. Moreno finished as the highest goalscorer in both the first and second half of the season with 11 and 19 goals respectably. He made his international debut in 2008 and, when fit, has been a regular ever since. Moreno is an exceptionally talented number 10, who drops deep to collect the ball but continues to regularly find the net in the final third. Nicknamed ´El Flaco´ by fans, he is tall and lanky, but shows good strength and superb control. He can elegantly slip past defenders and has scored numerous excellent long range efforts. Paris Saint-Germain, Sporting Lisbon, Juventus and AC Milan have all expressed an interest in the cultured striker.

Dorlan PabĂłn

PabĂłn made his Envigado debut aged 17 in 2006 and was part of the team which gained promotion the following year. He has since made nine appearances for the national side and he joined AtlĂ©tico Nacional in 2010. PabĂłn is quick and strong, he has excellent technique and he is able to create openings for himself and others. He has also shown excellent composure in front of goal; against Bolivia in a vital World Cup qualifier he ran onto a through ball, faked to shoot, and then lifted the ball over the goalkeeper into the far corner. Boca Juniors and Independiente have both already expressed an interest in signing the talented striker who will lead the line for Nacional in this year´s Copa Libertadores.

James RodrĂ­guez

James, named after his father´s favourite fictional British secret agent, broke into the Envigado side aged just 16 and made an immediate impact. Part of the club´s 2007 promotion-winning side, RodrĂ­guez scored 20 goals in 55 appearances over two years. RodrĂ­guez moved to Argentina with Banfield aged just 18, where he continued to impress with his quick feet and skilful dribbling. Two years later RodrĂ­guez moved to Porto for €5.1m, where he played alongside compatriot and former Envigado team-mate Fredy GuarĂ­n. The Colombian youngster played a key role in the Portuguese side´s success, scoring a hat-trick in the 2010 Portuguese Cup final. The youngster has been the national side´s best performer during recent World Cup qualifying matches; showing great maturity RodrĂ­guez orchestrated the midfield and created opportunities with his creativity and vision.

Fredy GuarĂ­n

Fredy GuarĂ­n made his Envigado debut aged 18 in 2004. The hard-working defensive midfielder made 38 appearances for the club, whilst also enjoying two loan spells, first with Argentine giants Boca Juniors in 2005 and then with Saint-Etienne in 2006. In 2007 GuarĂ­n completed a permanent switch to the French club before he was snapped up by Porto in 2008. GuarĂ­n made 63 appearances for the club and won nine trophies in three seasons, including the Europa League in 2010. Since January 2012 GuarĂ­n has been playing for Inter and is currently a key member of the Colombian national side. GuarĂ­n has all of the qualities of the complete modern midfielder. While he works hard defensively and is excellent at breaking up attacks, he is also comfortable on the ball and can open up defences with his incisive passing. Unafraid to shoot at every opportunity, GuarĂ­n has also scored some wonderful long range efforts for club and country.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > SĂ€o Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ

Dette indlĂŠg er blevet rettet 13. juli 2012 10:29 af Deportivo FAS
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En Blog/Artikel om det colombianske landshold past and present - i forbindelse med Jose Pekermans udnĂŠvelse som den nye trĂŠner for los cafeteros - artiklen viser ganske tydeligt at Colombia har potentialet til at kunne udfordre Argentina, Uruguay og Chile - spiller for spiller.


The Highs, The Lows And The Future Of Los Cafeteros

Written by Simon Edwards and Harold Palacio

As Pekerman prepares to take charge of his first game in charge of Colombia we look back at the countries greatest side; how the team of 1993 triumphed in Argentina and then crashed out of the 1994 World Cup against the United States. We will also look at Colombia´s current side and get expert views on how Pekerman can get the best from his talented squad.

The Colombian national football team arrived in the United States in 1994 as one of the favourites to lift the trophy. The team had eased through qualification, playing stylish, free-flowing football which had left some of the greatest sides in the world chasing shadows. The Colombian side finished qualifying top of their group with an astonishing 5-0 win in Buenos Aires, Argentina´s first ever home qualifying defeat. As the World Cup approached the Colombian press waited excitingly to showcase the cafeteros beautiful football on the world stage, pick up the trophy and reinvent the countries international reputation. However, rather than being the defining moment for an incredible team, the 1994 World Cup was a complete disaster. The project coach ´Pacho´ Maturana had been building had become discredited, while the faith Colombian´s had in the team evaporated. Colombia have been living off past glories since.

Colombian football, as with all area´s of Colombia, was transformed throughout the 1980s and into the 1990s, as international demand for Colombia´s illegal produce swelled the pockets of a small number of violent and reckless entrepreneurs. The implications were felt throughout the country, as small time criminals became multi-millionaire drug traffickers. Colombian officials were forced into complicity or acceptance, given generous bribes for their support or killed for their opposition. International authorities were slow to react to the influx of cocaine, and for over a decade Colombia´s cocaine cartel´s had free reign to accumulate and spend their incredible wealth as they wished. As a result Atletico Nacional, America de Cali and Millonarios all received substantial investment. Colombian football was now not only able to keep its star players within its domestic leagues, but it could also attract international stars to the country. Diego Maradona was offered $3 million by the head of the Cali cartel to play six months for America de Cali, alongside Peruvian World Cup stars Guillermo La Rosa and Cesar Cueto, Paraguayan striker Roberto Cabañas and Argentine international goalkeeper Julio Cesar Falcioni. Maradona is reported to have agreed, before his club manager reminded him that a deal with Barcelona had agreed.

However, the cartels did not only bring their money into the world of football. The conflict between rival drug gangs was played out on the football field in proxy, America de Cali and Millonarios received substantial financial backing from the Cali Cartel, while Atletico Nacional were supported by Pablo Escobar and the Medellin Cartel. Mafia leaders demanded return on their investments, and Colombian football became embroiled in violence and corruption. In 1986 alone eight officials were assinated, including the coach of the national youth team. The secretary of the league was killed in July 1988 and in November 1989 referee Alvaro Ortega was murdered for making a controversial call which enabled America de Cali to pull level against Independiente Medellin. In 1989 the league was suspended as football became overshadowed by violence, corruption and intimidation.

While domestic football reached new highs on the field and worrying new lows off it, the national team became a source of provide and hope in a country which was spiralling into chaos. Francisco ´Pacho´ Maturana became manager of both Atletico Nacional and the Colombian national side in 1987. He lead Atletico Nacional to Copa Libertadores glory in 1989 and in 1990 he led the Colombian national team to their first World Cup since 1962. The core of the 1990 Colombian team was made up of Nacional players, with charismatic Carlos ´El Pibe´ Valderrama captaining the side. Almost all of the squad played in the Colombian league and the team trained together for two days every two weeks throughout the season. The ciclo micro´s (micro cycles), as the training sessions became known, allowed Maturana to give the Colombian national side a real identity and unity. On the field they played fluid, free-flowing football which was reminiscent of the great Holland side of 1974 and an inspiration for the current Barcelona team.

Atletico Nacional´s Rene Higuita played an essential role in allowing Colombia´s midfield to dictate the play. The goalkeeper attracted international attention following his eccentric performance against England in 1988. ´El Loco´ saved a speculative Jamie Rednapp effort with his famous scorpion kick clearance and then dribbled the ball out from goal and rounded England´s star striker Gary Lineker. Colombia´s keeper played as a sweeper, allowing the defence to hold a high line and their midfield to dominate with their short passing.

Ahead of the 1990 World Cup, Maturana wrote that Higuita "gives us something no one else has, and we take full advantage. With Rene as sweeper, we have 11 outfield players". He continued, explaining that "Jan Jongbloed, the Holland keeper in the 1974 World Cup, also operated as a sweeper. With a difference. The Dutchman came out just to boot the ball into the stands. Higuita can do much more."

In 1990 the Colombia side qualified from their group with a 2-0 win over the United Arab Emirates, a narrow 1-0 defeat against a strong Yugoslavia side and a dramatic 1-1 draw with eventual winners West Germany. In the second round Colombia faced a good Cameroon side with an in form Roger Milla leading the line. Milla gave Cameroon the lead in extra time, before Rene Higuita was dispossessed by the ´indomitable lions´ striker close to the halfway line. Colombia pulled a goal back late on, but were unable to draw the tie level. The country was desperately disappointed to have been eliminated by one of the less renowned footballing nations, but a string of impressive performances put Colombia on the map.

Maturana moved to Spain after the tournament to manage Real Valladolid, but returned in 1992 as Colombia began their qualification for the World Cup in USA. Between tournament´s the team enjoyed a superb run of results, with only one defeat in 34 games. The campaign culminated with an away trip to Buenos Aires to face an Argentine side who were beaten finalists in 1990. In an interview a few days before the game Maradona dismissed the visitors chances, insisting "it´s always Argentina above and Colombia below".

Colombia went on to demolish their opponents 5-0 at El Monumental, inflicting Argentinas first ever home defeat in qualifying. Colombia lead 1-0 after a close first half, but as Argentina pushed for an equalizer Colombia took full control of the game. Valderrama was in inspired form; his poise and balance allowed him inexplicable room to dictate the midfield and pick passes for Colombia´s tireless runners. The side maintained the same domestic based core, honed and drilled with the bi-weekly ciclo micro´s. However, Asprilla and Rincon had now also been added to the squad. These pacey, direct attackers provided the side with a greater cutting edge which they had lacked four years earlier. Palmeiras´ Freddy Rincon and Parma´s Faustino Asprilla scored two goals each, while Bayern Munich´s Adolfo Valencia touched home the fifth. It was a complete and utter demolition. The Argentine crowd was stunned by the Colombian sides performance. After the fourth goal the home fans cheered each Colombian pass, as Valderrama orchestrated the midfield with Argentine players chasing shadows.

For the Colombian people, the side had gone from stylish underdogs to World Cup champions elect. Assistant manager Hernan Gomez has since expressed the concern the coaching staff felt as expectations reached terrifying new levels.

"When we scored the third, fourth and fifth goals I looked at Pacho and said to him, ´We´re in for it now.´ They (the media) were going to start saying we were the best team in the world. If we´d have lost they would have said we were the world´s worst, but that 5-0 scoreline worried me because there was no sense of perspective in the country" Gomez explained.

While Maturana shared his assistants concerns, he chose to emphasise the scale of the sides achievement.

"That result was excellent because we showed the world that Colombia can rise to the big occasion. Not for nothing did we reach three World Cups in a row. Some say that win went to our heads but that´s football. It´s a vehicle for dreams and disappointments and winning never does you any harm. That result has nothing to do with what happened later on" the manager insisted.

From an unprecedented high, Colombia fell to an all time low; completely discrediting the project which Pacho had been building. In 1993, talismanic goalkeeper Rene Higuita had been imprisoned by the Colombian government for his connections to Medellin cartel boss Pablo Escobar. Higuita had received payment for his role as an intermediary in hostage negotiations involving rival cartels. The goalkeeper was imprisoned for seven months before being released without charge. This meant that Colombia appeared at the 1994 without the influential goalkeeper. Instead, the manager turner to inexperienced America de Cali goalkeeper Oscar Cordoba. Cordoba was a talented shot stopper who had impressed during qualifying, but he was not the confident and calming, albeit erratic, presence that Higuita had been.

The Colombian side also faced other distractions as they travelled to the United States. The Colombian government had began a widespread campaign against the Colombian drug cartels and the cartels had responded with violence. Police, politicians and government officials all became targets for the cartels trained killers. With the Colombian state spiralling into chaos, the people hoped and expected that their footballing heroes would provide cause for celebration and begin to transform Colombia´s international reputation.

Colombia lost their opening game 3-1 to a talented Romanian side. Colombia dominated possession and played some excellent passing football, however, their play lacked the cutting edge which had seen them triumph over Argentina. Against the run of play Romania took a two goal lead in the first half, with superb individual efforts from influential playmaker Gheorghe Hagi and striker Florin Raducioiu. Valencia pulled a goal back for Colombia and they came close to an equalizer with efforts by Asprilla and Alvarez, but were unable to draw level. As Colombia pressed, Romania broke away and Raducioiu scored his second to put the game beyond doubt.

There have been many explanations for the sides disappointing performance. A columnist from Colombian newspaper El Espectador reported that after the tournament that Asprilla had suggested to him that some of the players may have been influenced by individuals who had placed bets against Colombia to under-perform. Others have suggested the players were overconfident and that they may have enjoyed too many pre-match parties in the hotel. While these claims remain speculation, what is certain is that the pressure on the shoulders of that team was immense.

On the morning of their vital second game against the United States Maturana received an anonymous message from Colombia. The message read, "if you select Gomez against USA, we will set off bombs against your families in Medellin". Maturana spoke to the Gomez brothers, Hernan Dario his assistant and Gabriel ´Barrabas´ Colombias experience defender. Gabriel didn´t play against the United States and retired from football shortly after. Those who played against the United States were literally playing for their lives. In an interview, Faustino Asprilla explained the fear he felt as kick-off approached.

"I was ready to play a good game but when I saw the trainer crying, the first thing I did after the team talk and before going to the stadium was to call my home. I wanted to know they were OK and to tell them to hide in case anything happened" Asprilla explained. "That´s what was on our minds as we went out onto the pitch, we knew there´d be trouble if we didn´t win and that we would be killed".

The source of the death threats has never been conclusively identified, but the claim that drug-linked syndicates who had bet millions on a Colombian win were responsible seems the most likely. Whatever the source, it is clear that the pre-match death threats only heightened the anxiety of players who were expected to perform under unbearable strain. Unsurprisingly the team underperformed and on 35 minutes Andres Escobar attempted to clear a John Harkes cross, but instead deflected the goal beyond Cordoba in the Colombia goal. Colombia dominated possession, but their passing was not as crisp and the movement not as fluid. On 52 minutes Earnie Stewart doubled the United States´ advantage and despite Colombia´s possesion they were unable to respond until the 90th minute. They had lost to the ´gringos´ in football. Maturana´s side had been tasked with redefining Colombia´s image and instead, Colombians felt the shame of losing to their swaggering neighbour to the north in football. The Cafeteros won their final game with an impressive 2-0 win over Switzerland. Despite the win they finished bottom of the group behind the United States.

The tragedy of 1994 was complete when Andres Escobar, a passionate defender and honest family man, was murdered upon his return to Medellin. Colombia had disappointed on the field and then been shamed by events of it. The 1994 World Cup had reinforced all of the worst international stereotypes about the country. Colombians had to again insist their team was ´better than you think´ and their country was ´not as bad as you have heard´.

Eighteen years have now past and both these claims remain true. While Colombia still has its problems, the country´s security situation is greatly improved and legitimate business now drives the development and improvements enjoyed in Colombia´s major cities. The countries football team lacked identity following the 1994 capitulation. The ´ciclo micro´ training routine was abandoned, and the Colombian side failed to instil a distinct identity. The club qualified for the 1998 World Cup with many of the players who had played in 1994. However, the sides most influential players were now in their mid-thirties and struggled to impose themselves on the game as they had in Buenos Aires five years earlier. The 1998 World Cup marked the end of an era, and Colombia have failed to qualify for any of the World Cups since. As other South American sides have improved, Colombia struggled as they have sought a new identity, a new ´Pibe´ and a Pacho.

Following a mixed start to Colombia´s 2014 World Cup qualify campaign Leonel Alvarez was replaced by Argentine manager Jose Nestor Pekerman.

Pekerman played as a right midfielder 134 times for Argentinos Juniors and then moved to Colombia, where he made 101 appearances. He was forced into early retirement at the age of 28 and then took up work as a taxi driver, before he got his first job as a coach for Chacarita Juniors youth side. He went on to work as a youth team coach for Argentinos Juniors, Colo-Colo and in 1994 Argentina´s under-20 side. As the national sides under-20 boss he lead the team to three FIFA World Youth Championship titles in 1995, 1997 and 2001. Pekerman become the boss of the Argentine national side in 2004 and lead them to the 2006 World Cup in Germany. His Argentina side played excellent attacking football, with Juan Roman Riquelme as the sides playmaker in the heart of midfield. The team was eventually eliminated in the quaterfinal on penalties against hosts and finalists Germany. The manager was criticised for his decision to replace Boca Juniors favourite Riquelme in the second half against Germany, as he sought to protect a narrow 1-0 lead. However, Argentinians generally consider the ´Pekerman Era´ to have been a successful one and AFA boss Julio Grondona reluctantly accepted his resignation in 2006. Since then Pekerman has managed in Mexico with Toluca and Tigres, before agreeing to join Colombia in January 2012.

So what is he likely to do as the manager of Colombia?

Well, it is almost certain that the Colombian side will be built around a ´10´. Since ´El Pibe´ Colombian football has prized a creative, playmaker more highly than any other position. All of Colombia´s major club sides are built around their ´10´. Atletico Nacional have Macnelly Torres, Junior de Barranquilla have Giovanni Hernandez, Millonarios have Mayer Candelo, Deportivo Atletico Huila have Sebastian Hernandez and Santa Fe have Omar Perez. A number of the Colombian league´s most successful recent exports have also been typical number 10 playmakers, such as Giovanni Moreno at Racing in Argentina and Aldo Ramirez who plays for Morelia in Mexico. Pekerman´s teams have also always focused around a number 10. As manager of Argentina he looked to Riquelme, while at youth level Andres D´Alessandro and Pablo Aimar played in that central position.

Pekerman sides have also been built around a solid defence. This would suggest that some of Colombia´s move extravagant and offensive midfield players may be dropped for the likes of Carlos Sanchez and Freddy Guarin.

David Ospina is the obvious choice in goal for Colombia, the young goalkeeper who plays in France is a superb shot stopper and a real star for the future.

In defence, Colombia have a number of exciting attacking full backs and experienced centre-backs. At centre-back Pekerman is most likely to choose the experienced pair of A.C Milan´s Mario Yepes and Atletico Madrid´s Luis Perea. The new manager has selected two further centre-backs in Bernardo Espinosa of Racing Santander and Aquivaldo Mosquero of Mexican club America, suggesting versatile Villareal defender Christian Zapata is most likely to figure at full back. The remainder of Colombia´s fullback options are all as well known for their attacking threat as their defensive reliability. Pablo Armero, Christian Zuñiga and Juan Guillermo Cuadrado are all Italian based wing-backs, who are able to play either at fullback or in midfield.

Inter Milan´s Freddy Guarin is a noticeable absentee for Colombia´s clash with Mexico for Pekerman´s first game, but the central midfielder is sure to be key to the new managers plans once he returns from injury. Further forward Pekerman will have to decide who out of Giovanni Moreno or Aldo Ramirez gets the coveted number 10 position in his side. It seems as though Giovanni Moreno, who has impressed in Pekerman´s native Argentina, is most likely to be chosen if both are fit. Macnelly Torres, who has been in form excellent for Atletico Nacional in the Copa Libertadores, was a surprise exclusion from Pekerman´s squad. The new manager will also have to decide how best to use James Rodriguez. James is able to play on the wing, behind the striker or in the centre of midfield, and has been Colombia´s stand out performer so far in qualifying.

Colombia are blessed with an excellent array of striking talents. Atletico Madrid´s Radamel Falcao is one of Europe´s most sought after strikers, and when fit is guaranteed Colombia´s number 9 shirt. Prolific Mexican based ´cha cha cha´ Jackson Martinez, who has both performed and been the subject of hip hop ode´s, is another option. The strong striker is excellent in the air and was close to sealing a ÂŁ10 million move to Liverpool in December. However, he is a very similar type of player to Falcao, and it is therefore unlikely that the pair will start together. Teofilo Gutierrez has scored 21 times in 34 appearances for Racing and he is probably the most likely to start alongside Falcao. Other options are the exciting and pacey Dorlan Pabon or Once Caldas´ skilful Dayro Moreno. Colombia´s strength in depth up front is such, that Premier League striker Hugo Rodallega and Hertha Berlin´s Adrian Ramos haven´t even made Pekerman´s 23 man squad.

Another talented absentee is Cagliari´s Victor Ibarbo. Ibarbo moved to Cagliari in 2011 from Atletico Nacional and has so far been limited to substitute appearances. Despite that, he is a real talent for the future and a player who is sure to feature in future Colombian sides. His strength, pace and skill have already drawn comparisons to Colombian great Freddy Rincon. Another talented star of Colombia´s youth side is 19 year old Edwin Cardona, who´s vision, quick feet and tidy finishing have already attracted international attention.

The ´Pekerman Era´ begins on Wednesday 29th February against Mexico in a friendly in Miami. Colombia currently has a group of international stars who play regularly in the strongest leagues in the world. While this brings with it many great benefits, it also provides a challenge. In 1993 Maturana was able to train regularly with the core of his side. Most of his team played in Colombia and they developed a shared vision and identity Pacho´s successful team. Pekerman must try to instil a distinct identity and form a unity amongst players from a variety of footballing backgrounds, who play with a variety of different styles. If Los Cafeteros can become a true sum of their parts, they may well be able to fulfil the hopes and aspirations of their predecessors twenty years earlier.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

As Pekerman´s first game approaches Colombian football experts give their views on how they feel the Argentine should approach his first game in charge.

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Charlie Parkinson, Medellin based journalist at ´Colombia Reports´


1. (GK) David Ospina (Nice)

2. (RB) Christian Zapata (Villareal)

3. (LB) Pablo Armero (Udinese)

4. (CB) Mario Yepes (AC Milan)

5. (CB) Luis Perea (At Madrid)

6. (DCM) Freddy Guarin (Inter Milan)

7. (RM) James Rodriguez (Porto)

8. (FW) Dorlan Pabon (Athletico Nacional)

9. (FW) Radamel Falcao (Ath Madrid)

10. (ACM) Macnelly Torres (Athletico Nacional)

11. (LM) Camilo Zuñiga (Napoli)


In selecting my Colombia eleven, the defence all but picks itself. While Ospina, Zapata and Armero are playing regularly at good European clubs, the dogs-of-war combination of Yepes and Perea at the heart of defence offers invaluable experience in a team which otherwise has an average age of under 25. On the flanks is the exciting young James Rodriguez, who has scored nine goals in eleven starts this season in the Portuguese league, and Juan Zuñiga, who often operates as a wing back at club level, but is comfortable playing in a more advanced role. The greatest headache in selecting the team was the dearth of top quality in central midfield, which precluded the use of a midfield three. Freddy Guarin is an obvious choice, but whether he manages to nail down a place in the Inter team will dictate his suitability for the future. In selecting his partner I chose the in-form Macnelly Torres, of Athletico Nacional, in part because of the relationship he has forged at club level with Dorlan Pabon, who is my choice to partner Radamel Falcao up front. The use of Torres, a creative midfielder who sometimes lacks the desire to help defensively, forces Guarin in to a more withdrawn role. Meanwhile the deployment of Pabon, a speedy and powerful goal scorer with four goals in three starts this season, seeks to take advantage of defensive holes which may appear from the likely double marking of Falcao.

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Lionel Londoño Martinez, London based Sports writer from Cali, Colombia

1. (GK) David Ospina (Nice)

2. (RB). Camilo Zuñiga (Napoli)

3. (LB) Pablo Armero (Udinese)

4. (CB) Mario Yepes (AC Milan)

5. (CB) Cristian Zapata (Villareal)

6. (DM) Carlos Sanchez (Valenciennes)

7. (RW) Elkin Soto (Mainz)

8. (DM) Freddy Guarin (Inter Milan)

9. (FW) Radamel Falcao (Ath Madrid)

10. (AM) James Rodriguez (Porto)

11. (LW) Guillermo Cuadrado (Lecce)


I believe David Ospina provides the team with security and reliability in goal. At full-back I would play Armero and Zuñiga as they are experienced, pacey players who are also excellent in possession. In the centre of defence I would combine the speed and strength of Zapata with the presence, composure and heading ability of Mario Yepes. I would play the defensive midfield duo of Freddy Guarin and Carlos Sanchez. Both players provide a strong physical presence in heart of the midfield, as well as good technique on the ball. Furthermore, if Guarin plays alongside Sanchez, then he would be able to break from midfield to support attacks. Cuadrado and Soto are both excellent athletes who can play box to box, and beat full backs for pace. James Rodriguez can organise the midfielder from the number 10 position, and supply passes for the lightening quick pair. In attack I would choose Radamel Falcao, who has provided a constant threat throughout his career. He will provide the focal-point for attacks and provide the majority of the teams goals.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > SĂ€o Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
Deportivo FAS
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13. juli 2012 13:11
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

PERU Runde 22

SÊsonens store overraskelse Real Garcilazo har overtaget fÞringen i Torneo Descentralizado, efter sejr over mestrene fra Juan Aurich pÄ 1-0 - mÄlet scoret af angriberen Andy Pando.

https://www.youtube.com/
EMhqIUwsssc


Det tidligere fÞrerhold Univeridad Cesar Vallejo tabte samtidigt 3-2 hjemme til storholdet Sporting Cristal - der nu er at finde pÄ tredje pladsen, Sporting mÄl blev scoret af Irven Ávila (m.4), Hernån Rengifo (m.51) og argentineren Jorge Cazulo (m.70), mens Claudio Velåsquez (m.32) ogRoberto Jiménez (m.63) scorede for hjemmeholdet.

https://www.youtube.com/
UsHpbkcSbdw




Rundens prÊstation stod paraguayaneren Ramon Cardozo for da han scorede alle mÄlene i Leon de huanucos 3-0 sejr over bundholdet Cobresol.



Cienciano og Alianza Lima fortsÊtter deres elendige sÊson med nederlag pÄ henholdsvis 0-2 til UNion Comercio og 1-3 til Sport Huancayo.

https://www.youtube.com/
ture=relmfu

Runde bÞd pÄ et traditionsopgÞr da Universitario under ledelse af trÊner Nolberto Solano hjemme tog mod Sport Boys fra Callao - gÊsterne har den Êre at vÊre det mest vindende hold der spiller i lyserÞdt i prof. fodbold - intet femset var der dog over forsvarspilleren Cesar Ruíz fÞringsmÄl - en fÞring der holdt til kort fÞr tid hvor hvor unge Andy Polo udlignede for La U kort fÞr tid. Det var Señor Polos nÊste sidste kamp for Cremas inden hans skifte til Italiensk fodbold og Genoa. Han sidste kamp bliver iÞvrigt imorgen - El Clasico nacional hvor Universitario Deportes og Alianza Lima tÞrner sammen pÄ Estadio Nacional i Lima

https://www.youtube.com/
ture=relmfu
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > SĂ€o Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ

Dette indlĂŠg er blevet rettet 13. juli 2012 13:23 af Deportivo FAS
a j o o b a
bruger
13. juli 2012 22:42
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Maxi tilbage til Rosario og Newells - loyalitet som vi kender det pÄ de kanter
"Maradona good; Pelé better; George Best."
Deportivo FAS
bruger
14. juli 2012 08:59
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Fedt ! - Den slags spillere er der alt for fÄ af - og godt for den argentinske liga som helhed. - Det virker iÞvrigt til at angriberen/offensive midt, Juan Manuel `Burrito` Martínez fra Velez (Som Valencia Äbenbart var interesseret i9 skifter til brasiliansk fodbold og Corinthians.

River plate har iÞvrigt sikret sig den unge angriber fra Juan Carlos Lescano fra Central de Cordoba - og er nu oppe pÄ sin 3 signing efter mÄlmanden Marcelo Barovero og forsvaren Gabriel Mercado. Umiddelbart kan jeg kun se at at

Boca har skilt sig af med 3 spillere Dario Cvitanich, Facundo Roncaglia og Gaston Sauro - mens man har skrevet kontrakt med Ricardo Noir - angriber fra Newells Old Boys.

StĂžrst udskiftning har der vĂŠret hos Estudiantes som har hentet 5 nye spillere, mens de har sagt farvel til tre heri blandt Veron og Boselli.

San lorenzo har smidt 7 spillere pÄ porten blandt de prominente navne er den uruguyanske angriber Carlos Bueno og Emmanuel Gigliotti som nu er at finde i Colón.

Endelig er det vÊrd at bemÊrke at pÄ trods af at Racing har sagt farvel til den colombianske playmaker Giovanni Moreno - har de....*wait for it....wait ...drumroll* hentet Jose Sand hjem fra Tijuana i Mexico.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > SĂ€o Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ

Dette indlĂŠg er blevet rettet 14. juli 2012 09:01 af Deportivo FAS

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