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14. marts 2014 18:53
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Brazilian club whose fans racially abused referee ordered to play five matches away from home

Esportivo, from the Brazilian state of Rio Grande do Sul, have been fined about USD$13,000 and ordered to play five matches away from their home stadium after some of its supporters allegedly called the referee a "monkey" and told him to "return to the jungle" in a match on March 5.

Some expected that Esportivo would be banned from this year´s regional tournament but the tribunal decided late on Thursday only to keep the team from playing at its stadium in the city of Bento Goncalves in its next five home matches.

The referee in question, Marcio Chagas da Silva, was in BrasĂ­lia at the invitation of president Dilma Rousseff at the time of the trial.

The Brazilian premiere invited the official along with Cruzeiro midfielder Tinga and Santos midfielder Arouca, both of whom have been the targets of racist taunts in the last month. Arouca was not able to meet with the president due to club commitments.

Rousseff has publicly condemned the racist incidents, saying "sports can never serve as a stage for prejudice" as recent incidents have made front-page news in South America’s biggest country.

Players and fans carried banners with anti-racism messages in several matches last weekend and more are planned in upcoming matches.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


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14. marts 2014 19:04
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

San Lorenzo: NĂ©stor Ortigoza plantea "salir de contragolpe" ante ColĂłn

BUENOS AIRES -- Néstor Ortigoza, mediocampista de San Lorenzo, consideró el viernes que el equipo necesita "manejar la pelota" para obtener un buen resultado el sábado contra Colón, líder del torneo Final, al que enfrentará por la octava fecha.

"Nos enfrentamos contra el primero, pero va a ser un partido difícil. Tenemos que manejar la pelota, estar juntos, esperarlos que vengan y nosotros salir de contragolpe", opinó Ortigoza, que volverá entre los titulares de San Lorenzo después de cumplir dos fechas de suspensión tras la expulsión en el encuentro con River.

Para el paraguayo, el encuentro del sábado a las 20.30, ante Colón de Santa Fe, como local es difícil pero accesible. "Nosotros vamos por el buen camino, aunque todavía falta mucho", expresó en una rueda de prensa.

San Lorenzo, que el miércoles último igualó 1-1 con Unión Española de Chile, tiene varias "cosas a corregir", aseguró Ortigoza.

"No podemos cometer tantos errores. No tenemos que cambiar tanto de un tiempo a otro, sino seguir con la misma intensidad. A veces hacemos un gol y nos replegamos para poder salir de contragolpe", analizĂł.

De todas formas, en referencia a la Copa Libertadores, donde el jueves 20 volverán a jugar con Unión Española, Ortigoza sostuvo: "Estamos todos con el mismo puntaje, pero dependemos de nosotros. Estamos obligados a ganar de visitante, porque somos un equipo grande, pero siendo inteligentes".
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


Indigente Cheto - "Uruguay Rusia Egipto Arabia Saudita. Tenemos mas chances de un atentado que de quedar eliminados"
Deportivo FAS
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14. marts 2014 19:06
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Racing: descartados Cahais y Villar

BUENOS AIRES -- La visita de Racing a Rosario se acerca y por eso, durante una hora y media, Reinaldo Merlo programó un ensayo con el objetivo de definir el equipo que jugará desde el inicio el próximo domingo.

Con Matías Cahais y Diego Villar descartados y con Francisco Cerro desgarrado, serán tres las variantes respecto a los once que cayeron ante Boca.

José Luis Gómez, Pablo Alvarado y Luis Ibáñez ocuparán los lugares de Ismael Quílez, Matías Cahais y Francisco Cerro. Justamente, el defensor proveniente de San Lorenzo tendrá su debut como jugador de Racing.

El equipo titular que parĂł Merlo y jugará ante Newell´s tendrá a: Sebastián Saja; JosĂ© Luis GĂłmez, Esteban Saveljich, Pablo Alvarado, Claudio Corvalán; Bruno Zuculini, GastĂłn Campi, Luis Ibáñez; Rodrigo De Paul; Gabriel Hauche y ValentĂ­n Viola.

Mientras tanto, el equipo suplente tuvo a: Nelson Ibáñez, Mauro Bazán, Yonathan Cabral, Esteban Espíndola, Alejandro García, Luciano Aued, Leonardo Rolheiser, Mauro Camoranesi; Guillermo Hauche, Roger Martínez y Luciano Vietto.

Vieto abandonó la práctica por una molestia en la cara posterior del muslo derecho , siendo reemplazado por Juan Carlos Melillo. Si bien no iba a ser titular, su presencia en el banco de suplentes el domingo está en duda.

Racing visitará a Newell´s desde las 17:00 hs. del domingo, con el arbitraje de DarĂ­o Herrera. Será el partido nĂşmero 16 del tercer ciclo de Reinaldo Merlo en Racing, habiendo conseguidos cinco triunfos, tres empates y siete derrotas.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


Indigente Cheto - "Uruguay Rusia Egipto Arabia Saudita. Tenemos mas chances de un atentado que de quedar eliminados"
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14. marts 2014 19:09
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Racism returns to remind Brazil of society’s ills

In two incidents last week, the spectre of racism spread its deathly chill through Brazilian football.

The first occurred on Wednesday at the Estádio Montanha dos Vinhedos, in the verdant hills of Rio Grande do Sul. Referee Márcio Chagas da Silva was on duty for the local state championship game between Esportivo and Veranópolis. The 37-year-old – voted the best official in the competition last season – would have been forgiven for expecting a fairly quiet night, but off-field events ensured that the match shot to national attention.

“As soon as I walked onto the pitch, I heard the home fans shouting racist abuse,” Chagas da Silva revealed later. According to the reports, a number of (so-called) supporters were calling him "monkey". Some impelled him to “go back to the circus”. “The jungle is your home”, yelled others. More bile rained down as he walked to the changing rooms at half-time.

Despite the acrid atmosphere, the game was completed. But the ordeal was not over. After Chagas da Silva had showered and changed, he wandered over to his car. The doors were dented and scratched. On the bonnet were two bananas.

Asked about the incident on television, the referee was visibly shaken up. “I am hugely saddened to have been treated in this way, especially in a supposedly educated society,” he said as tears rolled down his cheeks. “I thought about my son. I hope he never has to experience anything like this. It was horrible.”

Just 24 hours later, ESPN microphones picked up on racist chanting aimed at Santos star Arouca during his side’s 5-2 victory over Mogi Mirim. “It’s lamentable and unacceptable that this sort of thing still happens,” the midfielder wrote in an open letter on Friday.

These two cases came hot on the back of Cruzeiro player Tinga being racially abused in a game in Peru – an incident that caused some outcry – and served as potent reminders that, when it comes to discrimination, Brazil’s own house is not as perfect some like to think.

Brazil often presents itself – or is presented from without – as a bastion of racial harmony, the rainbow nation made flesh. In some ways, this view holds sway: few countries have diversity written into their DNA in the way that Brazil does. This land is African, indigenous, European and a million other things all at once, and celebrates its melting-pot identity with some verve. Frictions have flared through the ages, but assimilation has been the norm.
Yet things are not as rosy as they can seem. It has struck many that Brazil’s great social division – the staggering wealth gap that consigns millions of people to slum life with others swan about in gross opulence – is demarcated along racial lines. Poverty in Brazil is largely, although not exclusively, black (and ´Indian´) poverty. With income bleeding into education, there is at the very least a notable inequality of opportunity.

It could be argued that a bunch of idiots running their mouths at football matches has little to do with such structural issues. But the sporting world has always been an echo chamber for the broader gripes of humanity, highlighting and accentuating tensions that may otherwise remain unspoken.

Indeed, one need only glance at the difficulties encountered by black managers to see that the patterns at a macro level are reproduced in microcosm. For a country whose footballing history has been so shaped by black players, the demographic is markedly under-represented on Brazilian touchlines, with some coaches reporting an invisible glass ceiling. Lula Pereira, whose CV includes spells at Flamengo and Bahia but who has found work increasingly hard to come by, last year told Placar magazine that one club owner had turned him down with four gobsmacking words: “Sorry, but you’re black”.

Such attitudes, as Estadão columnist Antero Greco noted this week, show that Brazil is still behind the times. “We have a tradition of discrimination,” he wrote. “Football is just one of the areas in which it manifests itself.” If the game is, as Arouca claims, a “mirror to society”, Brazil cannot have liked the image that gazed back last week.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


Indigente Cheto - "Uruguay Rusia Egipto Arabia Saudita. Tenemos mas chances de un atentado que de quedar eliminados"
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14. marts 2014 20:34
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Angel Correa: Argentina´s next big hope?

Name: Angel Correa
Age: 18
Club: San Lorenzo
Position: Attacking Midfield
Nationality: Argentine


Since a glorious few years from the late 1990s to the early 2000s, during which Argentina produced a number of sensational footballing talents, the production line from the South American nation has dried up somewhat -- at least in terms of elite-level players. There has been talent developed, but the country´s youth sides have not continued to enjoy the same level of excellent results, while the likes of Diego Buonanotte, Pablo Piatti and Alejandro Gomez are among those to have failed to step up from teenage hope to senior star.

Erik Lamela or Mauro Icardi, perhaps, can still make that step up and help to fill the talent gap that has formed below the excellent 1988 generation of Angel di Maria, Ever Banega and Sergio Aguero. Neither Lamela or Icardi, though, are currently in the first team of their respective club sides. While a few years of lesser production is by no means a disaster, with Argentina´s current leading stars only in their mid-20s, the next strong batch of prospects needs to come soon if the nation´s current strength is to be maintained. Last year, we saw the 1993 generation flop at the South American Under-20 championship which the country hosted. Now, then, we must look to those born in 1995 for next year´s competition and, fortunately for the Albiceleste, they have a youngster with real promise to look to in San Lorenzo´s Angel Correa.

The diminutive forward comes with a sizeable reputation and, per the Mirror´s Ed Malyon, is already on the radar of Premier League giants Manchester City as they look to find the "next Aguero." His gift and skill are obvious, while it is no mean feat to survive physically in the rough and tumble world of the Argentine top flight. Indeed, Correa´s tenacity and workrate are noteworthy. Scouts, though, are understandably wary of a league that lacks quality in its prime and, as such, the likes of Ezequiel Cirigliano, Ricardo Centurion and Gino Peruzzi have all departed to sides outside of the established European elite over the past year. They are still required to prove themselves worthy at a "stepping stone" club before anyone is willing to part with significant money for their services.

With Correa, though, there is a feeling that he is a very special player. Physically, he is not dissimilar to Aguero, standing at just 5-foot-9 tall and with a fairly small physical frame. Like the City forward, he is also naturally right-footed and shows great fleet of foot to beat opponents in one-on-one battles. He may, at times, not use his low centre of gravity as well as he perhaps could, but he should grow stronger with age and better training regimes. Indeed, his lack of stamina and strength remain his biggest weaknesses at the present time. His agility and turning speed, though, make him a difficult proposition for opposition defenders to handle, while he has proven that his long-range shooting ability is a relative strength. In tight areas, his footwork can be mesmeric.

Were he to come to Europe, though, it is difficult to see him being used as a central forward in the 4-2-3-1 or 4-3-3 setups that most clubs employ. Correa is a good crosser of the ball and his speed would also see him well suited to a wide forward berth, which is no doubt where any initial strides abroad would be taken. Long term, though, his talent should be utilised in central areas, with his eye for a pass and decision making potentially good enough to be the focal point of an attacking unit. For San Lorenzo, he has predominantly be used as a second striker.

Born in Rosario and raised a childhood fan of both local side Central and, individually, Juan Roman Riquelme, Correa has already achieved much in making himself a regular in the San Lorenzo first team with such haste. Even before his first-team debut, he had a four-year contract to his name and expectations were high within the club he joined at the age of 12. His blistering start to his senior career, though, cannot have been expected.

His successful initial forays have only served to raise anticipation. He played an important role in San Lorenzo winning the Argentine Torneo Inicial late last year, while in the Copa Libertadores he now has a stage on which to take his talents to a wider audience. If San Lorenzo are to go far in the competition, he will be expected to make a major contribution.

Manchester City are known to be looking in Argentina for potential talent, with midfielder Bruno Zuculini set to arrive in the North-West of England this summer. The link with Correa, meanwhile, has been persistent enough that it too should carry some weight. As the tweet above shows, though, competition for his services will be fierce and, indeed, Diego Simeone-managed Atletico Madrid are believed to be the biggest threat to City´s efforts at present.

Correa, at present, is not ready for the pressure of moving straight into the first team of an elite European side and, given his tough upbringing, would need to be given plenty of time and help in adapting. A club with a strong and stable South American core, then, would be an obvious choice.

Adapting to life away from home has slowed the careers of many a talent to a halt and it would be a shame to see it happen to a player of Correa´s ability, but he will need special attention given both his age and background -- with both his father and brother having passed away just a few years ago. Economics dictate that he will be forced to move young, though, and it would appear that he will almost certainly do so this summer. Where he will end up, however, remains a mystery for the time being.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


Indigente Cheto - "Uruguay Rusia Egipto Arabia Saudita. Tenemos mas chances de un atentado que de quedar eliminados"
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14. marts 2014 20:37
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No place like home as Brazilian clubs reject new World Cup venues

When the Frank Sinatra of Brazil comes to town, it´s time to roll out the red carpet. What better venue, then, to host a Recife gig by legendary crooner Roberto Carlos than the new Arena Pernambuco built especially for the World Cup?

At least one, it seems. For rather than the new stadium, the singer´s concert in the city next month will be held amid the decidedly more spartan terraces of Arruda, the aging concrete bowl that is home to Santa Cruz FC.

"I don´t know why he decided to perform at the Santa stadium," said Ricardo Leitao, World Cup organising director in Pernambuco. "The arena was planned as a multiuse venue and was designed and built to host football matches and musical events."

"We wanted to put on the biggest show we could," said Cicao Chies, the show´s producer, who expects to sell 50,000 tickets for the gig. "Because of the location we decided that Arruda was the best venue."

While there has been much talk of the possibility of white elephant stadiums in "non-footballing" cities, such as Manaus, Brasilia and Cuiaba, where local teams have few fans, there is another more subtle threat to the long-term viability of a number of the new World Cup stadiums.

"The stadium needs around 33 well-attended football games and four international-level music shows [which is where the likes of Mr. Carlos come in] each year to cover its running costs," Ney Campello, director of SECOPA Bahia, the government World Cup organising body in the state, said last year of the new Arena Fonte Nova in Salvador. Well-attended football matches, he explained, meant a crowd of around 25,000.

Following this model, and even excluding the three "minor" cities mentioned before, six of Brazil´s new stadiums -- those in Rio de Janeiro, Belo Horizonte, Salvador, Recife, Natal and Fortaleza -- will rely on at least two big teams playing their games in the new stadiums to turn a profit. And in a number of these cities, the prospect of moving to a custom-built Sepp´s dream house has not exactly been met with open arms.

Perhaps the most high-profile resistors have been Belo Horizonte´s Atletico Mineiro, the reigning Copa Libertadores champions, and their chairman Alexandre Kalil. "The contract offered by the Mineirao is an embarrassment," Kalil said back in 2012. "Atletico have the right to sell tickets, and that´s it. Everything else is owned by the consortium [that manages the stadium]. It´s like we´ve gone back to the 1950s."

In place of the 60,000-seater World Cup stage, Atletico have continued to play their home matches at the cramped, if noisy, Independencia stadium in the city, which has a capacity of just 20,000. As recently as December, Kalil said that Atletico were studying the possibility of building their own ground, and that the team would play at the Mineirao only "if forced."

The situation in Recife is more problematic still. While the city´s smallest club, Nautico, were only too happy to flog off the prime real-estate land that lies beneath their dilapidated Aflitos stadium and move out to the new Arena Pernambuco, the switch has hardly been a success. The out-of-town venue is a drag to get to -- either 45 minutes by car or an epic public-transport journey by bus, metro train, another bus and then a lengthy hike to the grounds. "If they don´t improve things by the World Cup, then people will die here," a Uruguayan fan, appalled by the crushing at the metro station, told BBC Brazil during last year´s Confederations Cup.

Overcrowding is not, however, a problem that Nautico fans have had to face very often. With the team marooned at the bottom of the league in 2013, the club´s average crowd -- and therefore, excluding the Confederations Cup, the average crowd of the Arena Pernambuco -- was just 10,000. And most of those fans attended courtesy of the Pernambuco state Todos Com A Nota program, where fans swap shopping receipts for tickets, and the government later reimburses the club.

The plan is that the Arena will soon become home to all three of Recife´s professional teams. But neither Santa Cruz nor the other big club in the city, Sport, seem to be in much of a rush to move. Both have their own stadiums -- Santa, who attracted average crowds of almost 40,000 while in Serie D in 2011, play at the 60,000-capacity Arruda, while Sport play at the smaller but equally atmospheric Ilha do Retiro, and have long been discussing plans for a new stadium of their own. Why, then, move to a difficult to get to and expensive out-of-town stadium?

"We don´t mind playing at the Arena, but we can´t lose out financially," said Santa Cruz president Antonio Luiz Neto. Santa have now agreed to play a limited number of games at the stadium but only after being threatened with expulsion from the aforementioned Todos Com A Nota program, an important source of income for the club.

Similar problems also trouble stadium projects in Fortaleza, where, after a number of spats with the local football federation and stadium authorities, Fortaleza EC have yet to sign a contract to play their games exclusively at the Arena Castelao, and in Salvador, where Vitoria will play at the municipal Pituacu stadium while their own Barradao ground is being redeveloped for use as a World Cup training centre, rather than at the Arena Fonte Nova (although the club intends to use the new stadium for more important games).

There are many reasons for the reluctance to up sticks to the World Cup grounds. The most obvious is financial -- in most cases, the consortiums that manage the new stadiums retain the bulk of income from parking and refreshment stands, while the clubs have to make a large contribution toward the expenses of hosting games (70 percent in the case of Cruzeiro). Clearly, it makes more financial sense for clubs such as Santa or Sport to play in their own stadiums, particularly when crowds are likely to be small or when fans are unwilling to stump up for expensive tickets for low-key games.

Then there is the depressingly old-fashioned spectre of petty tribalism, the blood that pumps through the veins of Brazilian football. In many of the cases mentioned above, there is the sense that the new stadiums "belong" to one team or another -- the Mineirao has become Cruzeiro´s, because they moved back there first, the Fonte Nova is rivals EC Bahia´s rather than Vitoria´s, and so on. "When Paul McCartney played at the Arena Castelao, Ceara got VIP tickets, and we didn´t," Fortaleza marketing director Fabio Motta said last year.

And none of the clubs are willing to accept an inferior deal to their city rivals, so the Mineirao authorities, for example, cannot try to tempt Atletico to the stadium with better terms than they have offered Cruzeiro.

Finally there is the weakness of Brazilian football as a product. In the 1990s, following the Hillsborough disaster and Taylor Report, English football went through a stadium-rebuilding process of similar scale, with crumbling terraces swept away, replaced by shiny seats and more expensive tickets. Helped by already high demand and a massive television-funded rebranding exercise, the middle-class revolution of the Premier League era was, on the surface at least, a seamless process.

The same can hardly be said of the gentrification of the Brazilian game, where for myriad reasons (including a terrible fixture calendar, blanket TV coverage, high prices, impractical kickoff times and a fear of torcida organizada violence) average attendances are miserable and there is often little inclination among fans to attend games. The prospect of playing in front of tiny crowds in big, drafty FIFA-approved barns, no matter how pretty they are, it seems, does not yet appeal to everyone.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


Indigente Cheto - "Uruguay Rusia Egipto Arabia Saudita. Tenemos mas chances de un atentado que de quedar eliminados"
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14. marts 2014 20:41
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Tijuana-Galaxy could be the start of a budding rivalry

CARSON, Calif -- They may be two of the most popular North American soccer clubs within 200 miles of each other clashing in an international tournament, but don´t call the Los Angeles Galaxy-Club Tijuana Xoloitzcuintles de Caliente competition a rivalry.

Not yet.

Former Galaxy and current Xolos player Herculez Gomez was blunt when speaking about it on Wednesday.

"This rivalry talk makes me laugh. It´s one game," Gomez said.

In that first leg of the CONCACAF Champions Cup quarterfinal, the Galaxy won 1-0 thanks to a good first half and a timely goal by new Brazilian loanee Samuel. The lead held up even after a barrage of Xolos chances in the second half that kept the Galaxy´s Panamanian goalkeeper, Jaime Penedo, very busy.

Xolos coach Cesar Farias didn´t seem too concerned about his team being down a goal.

"The result doesn´t worry me, considering that we´re going back home, where we are very strong," he said after the loss.

Indeed, Xolos´ home record on the artificial turf in Estadio Caliente this year in Liga MX is daunting, as the club has only lost once. Their enthusiastic fans, still enamored with the team´s 2012 Apertura championship, are centered in Southern California, but not limited by the border between the United States and Mexico. The StubHub Center in Carson, where the Galaxy play, hosted a large contingent of red-and-black clad supporters for the CCL clash.

"I saw a lot of Tijuana fans," said Galaxy defender A.J. De La Garza. "I was a little bit surprised, to be honest. But the fans who showed up for the Galaxy were loud."

Cheers and chants went back and forth between different club fans all night, marking a change from more staid MLS match-ups.

"I thought the atmosphere was ridiculous," said Xolos player Paul Arriola. "Being here from before, it´s never really been like that, where half the crowd is for another team and half the crowd is for LA. It was interesting to see."

A bit of country pride tinged the competition, given how Mexican flags waved vigorously and the boos increased in venom whenever the Galaxy player Landon Donovan went near the Xolos fan section to take a corner.

"Our fans are the best, but when we go away to other teams in Mexico, there´s not that many that really travel with the team," said Arriola. "But I think because Tijuana is so close to San Diego, and Southern California, that there are a lot of fans here who wanted to see us. They always watch us on TV and I think they came out today. Some people also made the trip up from Tijuana."

The mid-week game, however lively, did not sell out though. Part of the reason was due to scheduling conflicts and stadium restrictions for the Galaxy, but probably also due to the fact that much of the CCL almost seems like a foregone conclusion. Again and again, Mexican clubs win, and have every year since the current format was adopted in 2008.

"(Tijuana) stressed the importance of this tournament," Gomez said. "This team wants to do big things. They´ve achieved so much in such a short time, yet they still have that hunger."

The international competition is meaningful to some across the border as well.

"It means a lot to the players," said Marcelo Sarvas, a Galaxy midfielder. "We know if we win this, we´d get to the Club World Cup. We could do something that has never been done in the United States, because it´s always Mexican clubs that win. So we want to make history."

While Mexican clubs occasionally lose to U.S. ones on American soil, the juggernaut of Liga MX victories in Mexico over MLS teams is formidable, so much so that is seems to have created a mental block for opponents, much like the mystique many ascribe to the famed Estadio Azteca, home of the Mexican national team.

For Sarvas, the lopsided results in Mexico´s favor aren´t a mystery.

"Everyone knows that the Mexican league is still above the American league,” said the Brazilian player. "They have more money and when you have that, you can do things better. They´ve been around longer. But we played well and we got the victory. In soccer, on any day, a team can win."

This year, the three MLS teams in the CCL, San Jose Earthquakes, Sporting Kansas City and the Galaxy, all head to Mexico hopeful of advancing. San Jose tied Toluca 1-1, while Kansas City defeated Cruz Azul, 1-0, to have the same slight advantage that the Galaxy hold over Tijuana before the final leg.

Yet only between Tijuana and the Galaxy will there be local bragging rights be at stake, along with perhaps even more. Both clubs pull players from the Southern California area into their soccer academies. Arriola was a Galaxy academy player before signing with the Xolos.

"I think Liga MX is a great place to develop young players," said the young forward.

On Saturday, Tijuana face Cruz Azul, the Liga MX leaders, in an important game before both clubs have to return to the CONCACAF tournament.

Veteran Donovan is well aware that the Galaxy´s slim lead will be under serious threat in Tijuana.

"In a perfect world, we would have won 3-0, but 1-0 is still good. We know that it´s going to be a difficult game in Tijuana, but we´ll be ready."

Gomez, for his part, expects the Xolos to adjust and play aggressively from the start.

"We have to put together a complete 90. It can´t just be 30 minutes where you play well and 20 minutes spent getting into the game," he said.

It may not be a rivalry yet, but everything has to start from somewhere.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


Indigente Cheto - "Uruguay Rusia Egipto Arabia Saudita. Tenemos mas chances de un atentado que de quedar eliminados"
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14. marts 2014 20:42
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Farias settling in for long haul at Xolos

TIJUANA – Mexican taxi drivers generally don’t need much prodding before the soccer pundit inside reveals itself.

On the way from Tijuana’s airport to the ever-growing Estadio Caliente complex, one particular taxi driver is freely giving his two cents on new Xolos coach Cesar Farias. Apparently, the club, which has risen from nothing to be a significant power in the Mexican game in just eight years, deserves a bigger name manager than the Venezuelan. The taxi driver seems perplexed at both why Victor Manuel Vucetich wasn´t hired and why the popular Antonio Mohamed felt it necessary to leave.

His opinion seems to be widely shared in the city. 

After all, Farias´ resume only includes a successful – if prickly – stint with Venezuela´s national team.

The truth is most Tijuana’s fans hadn’t heard of Farias when he was appointed, even if the 41-year-old had become somewhat of a talking point for soccer hipsters the world over with his bold pronouncements, that incident with Neymar, battles and his polemic stint as Venezuela coach, where he had the Vintotinto within five points of qualifying for the World Cup for the first time in the country’s history and restructured the youth set-up of a nation not known as one of South America’s soccer hotbeds.

The appointment of Farias represented a calculated risk from a Xolos point of view and the way he talks about football is a world away from the average Mexican coach.

The comparisons with Jose Mourinho, who Farias knows, are partially understandable, and he certainly isn’t short on confidence.

“I have a lot in common with other coaches, obviously, but Cesar Farias is Farias, I’m not imitating anyone,” Farias explained to ESPNFC in Tijuana recently.

The ambition the Venezuelan has is open and contrasts sharply with, say, current Mexico coach Miguel Herrera, who has stated being the national team coach is the ultimate goal.

“I will manage in Europe,” stated Farias, seemingly perplexed by the question of whether one day he would like to test the management waters in the Old Continent. “There are a lot of leagues (I’d like to coach in), but Spain, of course, is a special attraction.”

Before that becomes even a possibility, Farias is well aware that he’ll need to bring increasing success to a border club that has quickly gained its own identity in Mexico and has been a major success story in an area of the country previously not represented with a first division soccer team.

Farias says he was attracted to the club’s strong and growing youth system and future vision and while he has his own set of ideas on how the game should be played – plenty of possession, speed, organization, intensity, allowing individuals to shine – his tactical philosophy is also fluid and pragmatic, based on his idea that “football is like religion; everyone has the right to their own thoughts.”

He continued: “I don’t believe anyone who says that this or that is the only way to play football. If a team has (Lionel) Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo and a coach says they can’t play together because of a tactical problem, you are damaging two of the best players in the world, instead of developing them.”

So far, Farias has generally got it right at Xolos, who are in eighth position in the Liga MX after ten matches, although there have been teething problems.

The selling of Pablo Aguilar to America broke up his center back partnership with Javier Gandolfi, which had been the rock at the heart of Tijuana’s Apertura 2012 championship and 2013 Copa Libertadores run. 

Xolos haven’t been quite as assured at the back since and Farias’ attempt to change to a system with three central defenders against Chiapas on Feb. 21 failed spectacularly, with the opposition scoring three times in the first 45 minutes.

The next challenge for Farias is the hotly anticipated Los Angeles Galaxy clash on Wednesday and it represents a chance for him to stamp his authority on the club, to prove to the taxi driver pundits out there that he belongs at Xolos.

The MLS side’s preseason and first game has been analyzed extensively and Farias has even been crossing the border into San Diego for regular English classes.

"Part of me coming here (to Tijuana) is to take advantage and improve my English," he said.

The US is not new to Farias, who lived in New York from age three to six while his sister was fighting what turned out to be a losing battle against leukemia, but the English classes seem to sum up Farias, who is focused on building something in the present, while maintaining one eye on what he clearly believes will be a brilliant future.

A win in the series against Galaxy would do much to ease the concerns of those initial doubters.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


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14. marts 2014 20:45
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Pellegrino no cree que el clásico defina su continuidad en Estudiantes

LA PLATA -- El entrenador de Estudiantes de La Plata, Mauricio Pellegrino, confirmó el viernes el equipo titular con cuatro cambios para enfrentar el próximo domingo en el clásico a Gimnasia y Esgrima, por la octava fecha del torneo Final.

Respecto del empate sin goles como local ante Atlético Rafaela, el Pincha contará con los ingresos de Germán Re por Mariano González, Jonatan Silva por Ernesto Goñi, Franco Jara por Alvaro Klusener y Guido Carrillo por Juan Manuel Olivera.

De esta manera, el equipo saldrá a jugar en la cancha de Gimnasia con Gerónimo Rulli; Germán Re, Jonathan Schunke, Leandro Desábato y Jonatan Silva; Leonardo Jara, Gastón Gil Romero, Román Martínez y Joaquín Correa; Franco Jara y Guido Carrillo.

"Seguramente será un partido cerrado, difícil, dónde buscaremos revertir la situación de visitante, pero buscaremos ganar para mantenernos arriba", remarcó Pellegrini en rueda de prensa.

Con respecto a Patricio Loustau, quien será el
árbitro de la gran cita del fútbol platense, manifestó: "Le deseamos lo mejor y que podamos hablar del juego. Hay que estar muy concentrados, ya que vamos a jugar en una cancha sin la posibilidad de contar con nuestro público, pero son situaciones que se pueden dar a favor o en contra. Hay que saber manejarse y los chicos tienen mucha ilusión".

El entrenador, quien lleva cuatro fechas sin victorias con su equipo, a pesar de un arranque con tres éxitos consecutivos, dijo además que "un resultado no me define nada. Eso se lo pueden preguntar a Agustín (Alayes). Yo espero ganar y del futuro se hablará cuando corresponde".

Al recordársele que como DT de Estudiantes no pudo ganarle a Gimnasia ni a Troglio (dos empates y una derrota), el DT respondió: "No puedo pensar en los números, yo me tengo que centrar en el partido, porque si no me distraigo y eso no le sirve al equipo".

Pellegrino habló también de la ausencia del colombiano Erik Correa y señaló que "era un jugador en pleno crecimiento, muy importante para el juego directo que realiza Gimnasia".

"Pero cada partido es una historia distinta, dónde todos los jugadores buscan aportar. Para mi será un partido muy diferente al torneo pasado, al menos en cuanto a nuestro juego, y muy similar a los que disputamos en Mar del Plata", analizó.

Por último, se refirió a la ausencia de Juan Sebastián Verón y puntualizó: "Nadie puede negar lo que influye Sebastián, nos hubiera gustado que esté, pero sabíamos que era imposible. Se está recuperando bien y ojalá podamos contar con él pronto".

El plantel se concentrará el sábado al mediodía, tras la práctica matutina, dónde se repasarán jugadas con pelota detenida.
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo


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14. marts 2014 20:51
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Det er meget fint med Correa. Kommer han i VM-truppen? Og hvem er der ellers af spændende profiler pĂĄ sydamerikansk jord, som bliver ´one to watch´ til VM. Kunne godt bruge lidt alternative profiler til mit site.

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