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Deportivo FAS
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7. marts 2013 08:24
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Ny canalero i taliensk fodbold.

Jorman Aguilar al fútbol italiano

La joven promesa del balompié panameño, el delantero Jorman Aguilar, jugará con el equipo Primavera (equipo juvenil) del Parma de Italia. Antes de llegar a este club, realizó pruebas en España y Bélgica.

Llevaba un tiempo desaparecido de los medios, pero no alejado del fútbol. Ayer, en horas de la tarde, apareció en la palestra con una noticia que agarró por sorpresa a todos.

Se trata del joven delantero panameño Jorman Aguilar, quien ayer, a través de su cuenta de Twitter, publicó una foto suya con la camiseta del club italiano de la primera división, el Parma, acompañado del siguiente mensaje: “Contento de estar y poder formar parte de mi nueva casa y mi nueva familia #forzaParma”.

Tras la foto colgada por Jorman en la conocida red social, 10 Deportivo se contactó con una fuente cercana al jugador, quien corroboró que el ariete se encontraba en Italia y había firmado con el Parma, pero para jugar con el equipo Primavera (equipo juvenil). El otrora futbolista del Río Abajo FC vendrá la próxima semana a Panamá, se tomará algunos días de descanso y luego retornará al viejo continente.

La fuente añadió que Jorman se encontraba muy feliz y a gusto por esta oportunidad, y que espera poder triunfar en territorio italiano.

Antes de llegar al Parma, el mundialista sub-17 realizó una prueba en España con el Espanyol de Barcelona, de acuerdo a la información suministrada por la fuente. También estuvo en Bélgica, último destino previo a su fichaje por el llamado Crociati.

Actualmente, el Parma se encuentra disputando el Campeonato Nacional de Primavera, y ocupa la décima posición de la tabla con 20 puntos, producto de seis triunfos, dos empates y diez caídas.

Jorman Aguilar acompañará entonces al mediocampista Eric Orlando Herrera, quien viste los colores del AS Avellino (tercera división), como los dos futbolistas canaleros que militan en el balompié de Italia.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
Deportivo FAS
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7. marts 2013 08:28
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Husk at Dibbens drenge spiller mod LA Galaxy i nat (dansk tid)..og Copa Libertadores - et af sportens allerstørste historiske opgør når Boca Juniors møder Nacional fra Montevideo - det er Riquelme mod Recoba - " El Tanque" Silva mod sin landsmand " El Loco" Abreu - det bliver blod , sved...og passion ...
Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
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7. marts 2013 09:03
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

AN OBSESSION WITH MARCELO: NO MADNESS AT ALL

"If I were to say what I really think I would be arrested or shut away in a lunatic asylum. Come on, I´m sure that it would be the same for everyone."

On insanity, few have been more veracious than the Chilean writer Roberto Bolaño. In his own inimitable way the nomadic novelist and poet acknowledged what others often refuse to see; that we are all unhinged in our own delicate fashion. To some extent we will freely admit to our peculiarities, but largely our madness is defined by those around us, who witness our behaviour and for reasons of comfort believe it to be more abnormal than their own. How strange it is to be denied even the possession and enjoyment of our own madness by people who yearn to tell us that, yes, we are certainly mad.

Bolaño died of a long illness in 2003 at the young age of 50. Four years later Chile had a new icon of insanity, as Marcelo Bielsa was appointed manager of the national team following a three-year hiatus from the game. How Bielsa had spent his prolonged absence remained a mystery to many, but upon his return it was reassuring to see that nothing had changed. Obsessive, compulsive and still Loco, as everyone wished him to be.

´What could be more foolish in this life than having a passion for football?´ wrote Chilean journalist Patricio Navea before Bielsa´s arrival. ´Only those of us who wept with Caszely´s penalty or shouted every goal scored by the Za Sa duo, or simply wake up in a good mood the Monday after our team has won can understand this. Football is like religion. Those without faith don´t get it.´

Even more so would they struggle to understand Bielsa, an obsessive whose cult of personality had grown through anecdotal evidence attesting to his madness. This was a coach who had taken 1,800 video tapes to the World Cup in 2002 when he was manager of Argentina and, after deciding that wasn´t enough, requested that a further 200 be flown out to Japan.

Chileans were familiar with Bielsa´s habits owing to his Argentina tenure and previous spells at Newell´s Old Boys and Velez Sarsfield. He arrived with a reputation for being intense, occasionally with a ferocious temper, and above all having an unwavering dedication to his craft. "I celebrate the fact that we´ve been handed matches that make life worth living," said Bielsa when Argentina were drawn in a group with England in 2002.

But beyond tales of his eccentricity, Bielsa was and still is renowned for being a man of principle. After guiding Newell’s to a second Primera Division title in his first managerial role, the coach allowed his team to attend a friends’ wedding on the condition they were home by one o´clock because of an upcoming cup match. When he discovered that several players stayed out until the morning Bielsa asked the club to fine them for indiscipline, and following the board’s refusal he promptly resigned. Two years, two titles and a Copa Libertadores runners-up medal; it ended in the blink of an eye.

Despite leading Chile out of the international wilderness and to the second round of the 2010 World Cup, Bielsa´s principles again paved the way for his premature departure. The election of businessman, Jorge Segovia, as the new president of the Chilean FA saw two polar visions on the national set-up collide and Bielsa, true to form, followed up the threat of his resignation. Protests and petitions followed but the campaign to keep the Argentine ended in vain before he returned to Europe with Athletic Bilbao.

That Bielsa remains resolute to his moral code is often overlooked for entertaining stories that preserve his ´El Loco´ persona. Athletic forward Iker Muniain has claimed that his coach is "madder" than he is depicted by the media and Bielsa certainly pandered to his nickname amid an altercation with a construction worker at the club´s training base in the summer. But there was reason behind his anger. "The condition of Lezama is an insult to the players and I am responsible for them," Bielsa explained. "I was indignant because that was not recognised and began to say offensive things. I don´t respect him because he did a bad job." If something is worth doing, it´s worth doing well. Athletic´s failure to support their coach very nearly ensured another resignation.

Perhaps nothing better captures the fascination with Bielsa´s character - the obsession over obsession - than a brief press conference exchange, recounted by Spanish football writer Sid Lowe, following a 2-2 draw between Athletic and Villarreal last season. El Loco had been in a particularly fraught mood throughout the match, pacing the touchline unremittingly and stopping only to crouch on his haunches; a familiar sight. One journalist had noticed that every time Villarreal attacked, Bielsa took exactly thirteen steps across his technical area. Was it superstition or mere coincidence, he asked. "What is coincidence, is that when there´s such a nice game going on, someone spends time counting my paces," answered Bielsa. The journalist had been too preoccupied with the ringmaster to enjoy the show.

For all Bielsa´s achievements in captivating football´s diverse audience, and the admiration he has earned from his colleagues, he has always been revered with caution and curiosity. Tales of his tender nature have revealed his warmth and generosity, such as the time he readily relinquished tickets to a Copa Libertadores match to two penniless children before heading home to watch the game on TV. But how can even the most committed of football fans relate to a man known to sit in solitude at the training ground, analysing video footage in unparalleled, perhaps even unnecessary detail until the early hours? "Do you know that I die after every defeat?" Bielsa once said. "The next week is hell. I cannot play with my daughter or eat with my friends, it is as if I do not deserve those everyday joys."

Bolaño would have known how he feels. ´About happiness he said not a word,´ the author described one of his many colourful characters. ´I suppose because he considered it something strictly private and perhaps, how shall I say, treacherous or elusive.´

Whether Bielsa appreciates his indelible impression is unknown and unlikely. He has noted that "a man with new ideas is mad until he succeeds", but how should we define success in a game of few tangible rewards? No, Bielsa´s trophy is his madness, which is madder than that of any other and yet barely madness at all.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
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7. marts 2013 09:06
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

TRINCHE

In 1993, when Diego Maradona returned to Argentina to play for Newell’s Old Boys after a hugely successful career in Europe, he had established himself as the greatest player of his generation, possibly all-time. Upon his return a journalist commented that the greatest footballer had arrived in Rosario. Maradona responded by saying “The best footballer has already played in Rosario, and his name is Carlovich.”

Felipe Tomas “Trinche” Carlovich, a name revered on the streets of Rosario but less well known around the world. Maradona is not alone in his respect, but how is it that such a player did not have a more decorated career and why is he not more of a household name?

Trinche was born in 1949 and grew up in the neighbourhood of Belgrano in Rosario. Rosario is situated about 300 km north west of Buenos Aires on the western shore of the Parana River meaning that it has always been inundated with immigrants from across Europe. Son of a Yugoslavian immigrant, Trinche remained tied to both his family and the streets he grew up in in Belgrano. The same streets in a humble area of the city where a young man learned and developed his extraordinary talent. This upbringing and the connection with the area go some way to explaining why he is not more of a household name.

By his own admission Trinche never aspired to be a professional footballer and all the fame and success that comes with it. The dreams of most children in Rosario fall into two categories – play for Rosario Central or play for Newell’s Old Boys. Although Trinche was not someone who shared these desires, it was Rosario Central who first offered him a route into professional football in 1969. This was short lived as chances were not as prevalent as he would have liked and so he asked to be released. This led to a brief spell at Flandria before a move to Independiente Rivadavia and then Central Cordoba, the two clubs for which he is best known and the clubs that Trinche described as “the two loves of my life.”

The legend of Trinche in many ways was born at Rivadavia where he quickly became a favourite with the Mendocinos. His amateurish appearance with shirt unbuttoned, chest puffed out and no shinpads so his socks rolled down made him instantly recognisable and someone the fans could relate to. He was also part of a Rivadavia team that famously beat Inter Milan. But his time was short as the boy from Rosario could never leave behind his home on the banks of the Parana. Teammate at Rivadavia, Hugo Memoli captures both how much Trinche wanted to return to Rosario and also his outlook on football, “We played against San Martin and Thomas (Trinche) wanted to go that afternoon to Rosario. But if he played the whole game he missed the buses so he was sent off in the first half. He bathed and left running. He never took anything too seriously.”

Before too long Trinche got his wish and returned to Rosario to play for Central Cordoba during his most successful spell as a footballer and undoubtedly the most important. He was back home and for him to play for Central was akin to playing for Real Madrid. With him, Central Cordoba won two second division championships, one in 1973 and another in 1982, a small return for such a great talent. While there, it’s claimed that Trinche received bonuses for the number of nutmegs he could perform and he would sit on the ball during the games so he could “have a break”. The validity of these claims is irrelevant now but they all contribute to the story of Trinche.

Perhaps the most famous event in Trinche’s career came in 1974 when as preparation for the World Cup the Argentina national team travelled to Rosario to play a friendly game against a team of players exclusively from the city. Trinche Carlovich was in good company in a Rosario team featuring Mario Kempes and Mario Zanabria. At half time the team from Rosario were leading three nil with Carlovich pulling the strings from midfield. They were so dominant that the Argentine manager, Vladislao Cap, asked Rosario to substitute him at half time. They did so and the final score was a 3-1 victory to Rosario.

Somewhere between the myth and the legend there must be some truth judging from the testimonies of so many respected figures. Daniel Passarella and Diego Maradona both held Trinche in the highest esteem and Jose Peckerman claimed he was the best central midfield player he had ever seen. These events were the pinnacle of his career and while some may ask why he never did more, he was content with his life and aspired to nothing more, not willing to commit to strict training and dietary habits and certainly not to moving away from his beloved Rosario. Offers arrived from New York Cosmos and Milan but none of this interested Trinche. His family, his friends, the neighbourhood he grew up in and fishing were all more important.

Now almost 70, and continuing to shun the limelight, Trinche’s career is like a series of Chinese whispers as tales of his achievements are passed from person to person without much in the way of evidence. This adds not only to his legend but also to the romanticism of football. Every great footballing nation has its own Trinche, a once in a generation talent left unfulfilled for one reason or another, but who still has the ability to enrapture football fans around the world through the legacy that they leave and the ‘what if’s’ left unanswered.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
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7. marts 2013 09:10
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Lidt nyt fra Nicaragua....
FÚTBOL IN A BASEBALL PARK

On Sunday 27th January 2013 the final of the Copa Centroamericana was settled by a firm header from Costa Rican defender Geancarlo González. The hosts extravagant celebrations in their modern national stadium belied the fact that it’s not the most prestigious international tournament. Held every two years and featuring the seven Central American nations, the prize for the participants is obtaining one of five places at CONCACAF’s Gold Cup, held in the United States later in the calendar year. Such was the competition’s lack of esteem, beaten finalist Honduras’ domestic league had a full programme throughout, and the only European-based players called upon were those on a winter break.

For the majority of the nations, qualification for the well- attended, money-spinning Gold Cup is seen as little more than a formality. But for one, the Copa Centroamericana is a rare opportunity to participate in competitive international football matches. Nicaragua’s draw against Guatemala in the opening game of Group A was the first real challenge they’d faced for over a year. The largest country in the isthmus has only ever qualified for one major tournament and are regularly beaten by countries with a fraction of their resources and population. Arguably their most embarrassing failure came in 2008.

The first round of the CONCACAF qualifiers for the World Cup 2010 involved 3 Central American countries and an assortment of Caribbean sovereignties contesting to progress to the next of 4 stages. Tiny El Salvador and Belize both breezed past their less fancied opponents, the former 16 v 0, whilst Nicaragua fell at the first hurdle. They were defeated home and away by Netherlands Antilles, a group of small islands containing less than 200,000 people. Whilst most of the underdog’s squad were seasoned professionals playing in Europe’s lower leagues, many were making their international bow over the two legged tie. The result was hardly greeted with a great deal of surprise amongst the CONCACAF community, despite the fact that Nicaragua is surrounded by countries with Finals pedigree, such as Honduras and Costa Rica.

In 2010 my travels saw me take in the semi-finals of Honduras’ biannual championship, followed by Nicaragua’s domestic league and cup finals. The matches I witnessed in Honduras were passionate affairs watched by crowds of thousands in sizeable football grounds. Their neighbour’s league final was played in a baseball park to a handful of spectators. Throughout the 4 months I spent teaching English in Nicaragua’s disorganised capital, Managua, I tried to fathom why there was so much disparity between the region’s Seleccións (national team).

Considering Nicaragua’s size and vast natural resources I was surprised that it’s GDP per capita is one of the lowest in Latin America, only Haiti has a poorer population. In the 1970’s a devastating earthquake and a crippling civil war turned one Central America’s richest nations into its least wealthy. Since a revolution in 1979 the socialist Sandinista party has controlled the main governmental institutions, even when they haven’t officially been in power. With crippling poverty and a crumbling infrastructure, football hasn’t been high on their agenda, particularly as baseball and boxing are considered more popular sports.

Despite currently only consisting of 4 teams, the national baseball league is professional. There is an array of impressive stadiums dotted around the country’s major cities and there have been a number of Nicaraguans competing in the US Major League, including the first Latin-born player to pitch a perfect game. The nation also boasts two boxing world champions, although Alexis Argüello, the most famous of the pair and major of Managua, died under suspicious circumstances in 2009 (many believe that the government were involved in his demise).

Fútbol may not be their national sport, but the population is passionate about the game, which was particularly evident during South Africa 2010. Even though the fixtures were early in the day (some kicked off at 05:30) the capital’s bars were awash with shirt-wearing, flag-waving supporters, most of them supporting the European nations with historical roots there, Germany and Spain. There were also strong allegiances to the top EPL and La Liga sides. Travelling around the country the kids I saw playing in the street were not swinging bats, but kicking tattered footballs. There was clearly a growing enthusiasm for the sport but the authorities seemed reluctant to exploit this.

One afternoon I crossed paths with a British lad in his mid-thirties who had married a Nicaraguan girl and was employed by private schools as a football coach. Such was the lack of formal experience in the country that the FA badges he had recently studied for made him one of the most qualified coaches around. His opinion was that the meagre amount of funds that were allocated to fútbol development were ‘lost’ before they got to grassroots level, generally through corrupt politicians. In his attempts to scout future talent he’d ventured into the rural areas surrounding the capital. At one under 14’s training camp he thought he’d discovered the new Messi, as slight boy who looked no older than 8 was tackling and dribbling around players twice his size and stature. At the end of the session he offered to fund the youngster’s transport costs so he could attend a junior trial in Managua. The kid laughed at the suggestion, saying that he didn’t qualify as he was 13 and he’d have to work on the family farm that day anyway. It turned out that severe malnourishment was the reason that the teenager looked so young.

I’d seen the strongest domestic side, Real Estelí from the northwest, face Managua’s Walter Ferretti in the league and cup finals on consecutive sunny Sundays. The first was comically staged in Estelí’s baseball park, as the club was preparing their football ground for the CONCACAF Champions League. The Northern Train (El Tren del Norte) won both domestic competitions but complications with their home venue saw them disqualified from the continental tournament. This was not seen as too much of a tragedy as they haven’t once made it past the first round. Very few Nicaraguan footballers get the opportunity to play at the top level abroad, with the majority of the current Selección competing at home. The 8 team domestic league struggles to provide the new generation of enthusiastic talent with the competitive challenges they require to improve, which has created a vicious circle.

Less than a year after the Netherlands Antilles defeat the Selección participated in the 2009 Copa Centroamericana. They lost heavily to hosts Honduras, but draws against Belize and El Salvador were a step in the right direction. Uncharacteristically Nicaragua didn’t finish bottom of their group, reaching the 5th/6th place play-off against Central America’s most populous nation, Guatemala, for a spot at the Gold Cup. The Nicaraguans claimed a rare victory to qualify for their first ever major competition. Unfortunately they bowed out after a disastrous campaign in the USA, not scoring a goal, let alone claiming a point. Two years later Guatemala gained their revenge in Panama City, claiming 5th place in the Copa Centroamericana. The 2011 edition was seen as a precursor to the big prize at stake later in the year; qualification for Brazil 2014.

Drawn in a group with experienced campaigners Panama and outsiders Dominica, Nicaragua started impressively by scoring two goals of remarkable quality in the Caribbean nation’s capital, Roseau. In the key second fixture, favourites Panama arrived at Managua’s one-sided, partially-constructed national stadium in good form. Striker Luis Tejada, a veteran of the Latin leagues, stole in to head the visitors into the lead. A fortuitously sliced own goal restored parity shortly afterwards, sending the supporters housed in the lone stand into raptures. As the contest progressed the hosts looked increasingly drained, both mentally and physically. They were undone by good combination play between Panama’s experienced forward pairing, Blas Peréz turning sharply to score following Tejada’s cushioned header. Despite a late rally their hopes of progressing looked to be over. This was confirmed in Panama City a month later when Peréz and Tejada shared 5 goals between them. Commendably the Nicaraguans raised themselves in their final match and achieved the double over Dominica.

Instead of building on the improving performances, the Selección only played in 4 friendlies between November 2011 and January 2013. All those matches were against Puerto Rico, a country with no real international experience. In the same timeframe Guatemala competed 16 times, 10 of which were friendlies against a diverse range of opponents. Nicaragua’s lack of preparation resulted in a last place finish in the latest Copa Centroamericana. Belize’s 90th minute winner in the final group fixture sealed their fate and took the nation of a third of a million people to the Gold Cup for the first time.

Whenever I have asked natives why there is such a lack of care and attention paid to football, I’ve always received a similar response: a shrug of the shoulders, usually accompanied by the phrase: ‘it’s political’. There is such a lack of available public information about so many facets of Nicaraguan society that it’s almost impossible to separate fact and speculation. Leader of the Sandinista party, Daniel Ortega, was controversially re-elected to office in November 2012, having amended the constitution to allow a President to stand more than one term. In my opinion the socialist’s control of the government is the main reason for Nicaragua’s lack of progress over the past 30 years. But then again Venezuela has had a similar political set-up, and in 2011 they reached the semi-finals of the Copa America, progressing further than Brazil and Argentina. Some people are of the opinion that baseball’s influence is a major factor, although they fail to acknowledge that this is also Panama’s national sport and their Selección is miles ahead in terms of development.

It’s not all doom and gloom. Once construction on the national stadium has been completed it is anticipated that it will provide the Selección with the most modern facilities in Central America, raising the profile of the sport, and encouraging more youngsters to get involved. Inexperienced Spanish coach Enrique Llena has been tasked to manage all levels of the national side; there is hope that his emphasis on youth development will pay dividends in the future. How long both projects will take to complete is debatable. In a country where the capital’s streets have not been assigned names (they refer to addresses in relation to landmarks) and the government is heavily influenced by Caracas and Havana, progress is frustratingly slow. As with many of the Latin minnows, if one player can succeed in a high profile foreign league, the impact can really galvanise the nation’s football infrastructure. Until then Nicaragua will more than likely remain Central America’s underachievers.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
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7. marts 2013 09:25
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Luiz Felipe Scolari: Neymar should have joined Barcelona two years ago

Brazil coach Luiz Felipe Scolari believes that Neymar should have joined Barcelona two years ago, but thinks that he is better off remaining at Santos now.

The 21-year-old has been heavily linked with a move to the Camp Nou, as well as Real Madrid and Bayern Munich, over the past few months.

However, Neymar remains rooted in Brazil with his boyhood club, and Felipão thinks that it would be tough to join the Blaugrana now and hopes that the Seleção star stays in his homeland until after World Cup 2014.

He said: "Neymar should have gone to Barca two years ago, but now it is better that he stays at Santos.

"How would he adapt? Would he be by himself? Would he start games? Would he play in this star-studded Barcelona team?

"For the World Cup of 2014 and for Brazil, it is preferable that he does not go right now."

Neymar was named alongside the likes of Kaká, Dante, Dani Alves and Lucas Moura in Scolari’s squad announcement yesterday for friendly games against Italy and Russia this month.


Lucas Moura aims to surpass Messi and Ronaldo, says PSG team-mate Alex

PSG´s Alex has revealed that his compatriot Lucas Moura aims to be better than Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo one day.

The Parisien club snapped up the playmaker from São Paulo for a fee of €40m and the Seleção star has made an instant impact in the French capital.

"He is a young talent looking to develop," Alex told L’Equipe. "He came here for a lot of money and he wants to fulfil the expectations placed upon him.

"Lucas even aspires to one day become better than Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo."

Lucas is currently competing with Neymar as one of Brazil´s best emerging talents and the PSG midfielder could yet rise to be one of the world´s best under manager Carlo Ancelotti.

But PSG have a Champions League test before that as they take on Valencia in tonight´s fixture.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
andib
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7. marts 2013 15:27
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Tror din kæreste har installeret et anti-larissa-spam-filter.
Så må vi finde andre veje. Det er også noget video-materiale fra seancen :)
http://www.youtube.com/w…UqaiXh_rhdE
Begge ting virker her nu, så Larissa-spam filteret er væk igen. Tak for link, Samba. Det var 2½ jeg var glad for jeg brugte sammen med Larissa.

Jeg overvejer at sove tidligt i aften og i stedet for stå op og se La Galaxy - Herediano. Det plejer bare ikke at være et hit at gøre det på den måde.
Kenny Dalglish had scouted the young star at Bordeaux, and requested the chairman Jack Walker to begin discussions with the player’s club. He refused, and famously said, “Why do you want to sign Zinedine Zidane when we have Tim Sherwood?”
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7. marts 2013 17:54
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

godt initiativ - med en latino-lur unge mand....


lidt brasser-gossip.

Former Flamengo keeper denies ordering ex-girlfriend´s murder

Former Flamengo goalkeeper Bruno has denied charges that he ordered the murder of his ex-girlfriend, but admits that he knew of her death.

Bruno said during the trial in Minas Gerais on Wednesday that a friend hired someone to kill his former girlfriend, model Eliza Samudio, who was allegedly dismembered before being fed to dogs.

The former goalkeeper said he ´´was not the one who ordered´´ the killing but ´´in a way´´ feels ´´guilty´´ for her death.

Bruno was captain of the Flamengo team that won the Brazilian championship in 2009 and made 134 appearances for the club.

That year, Samudio made the first allegations to police that she was pregnant with Bruno´s child, and that the player and others kidnapped her and tried to force her to terminate the pregnancy.

He is being charged with ordering Samudio´s murder.



Corinthians´ Ralf: Artificial turf not to blame for defeat

Corinthians midfielder Ralf has dismissed claims that the artificial turf at Tijuana´s Estadio Caliente was to blame for their 1-0 defeat.

Tijuana caused a shock upset by winning their Copa Libertadores clash after a superb backheeled finish from captain Javier Gandolfi in the first half.

Ralf took the time to tell reporters in Mexico that playing on artificial grass was hard but not an excuse.

"It is difficult, quite horrible, but it is not a reason (for the loss). We lost because we failed to score goals, not because of the field," said Ralf.

The result leaves Tijuana at the top of the table, one point ahead of the defending champions who will have to be wary of the threat from Colombia´s Millionarios in third, who are also one point behind.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
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7. marts 2013 18:00
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Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

Et par eksspillere påtænker at vende tilbage til argentinsk bold....



River: Demichelis analiza el regreso

BUENOS AIRES -- Martín Demichelis, actual defensor del Málaga español con origen "millonario", afirmó hoy que el vicepresidente del club de Núñez, Diego Turnes, "fue el primer dirigente de River" que le "pidió personalmente volver al club".

"Le dije a Turnes que desde que llegué a Europa es la primera vez que un dirigente quiere que vuelva y se presenta personalmente para decírmelo. Escucharlo cara a cara fue muy grato para mi", confesó Demichelis al "Superclásico" de Radio 9 respecto de la reciente visita que recibió del segundo de Daniel Passarella.

"Turnes me abrió las puertas del club para que regrese y eso fue muy agradable para mí. Mi contrato con Málaga vence el 30 de junio y en este tiempo voy a tomar una decisión", destacó.

"Micho" aclaró que en "este momento hay que disputar muchas cosas con Málaga. Y yo respeto mucho a la gente de este club", advirtió.

"Lo que sí, cuando termine mi carrera futbolística voy a vivir en Argentina, más allá de cualquier problema que exista en el país. Y ahora analizo la posibilidad de volver porque el reciente fallecimiento de mi padre (en un accidente automovilístico) fue un palazo muy fuerte y estoy muy triste", confió.

"Hoy en día son mis hijos los que me dan las pequeñas alegrías y las fuerzas para seguir adelante", reconoció.

Acto seguido y al efectuar un breve repaso de su carrera, el cordobés sostuvo que en "Bayern Munich" aprendió "mucho en lo deportivo, pero también en lo personal. Hay que tener en cuenta que estuve en uno de los clubes más grandes de Europa".

Otro tema que lo mantiene expectante es el seleccionado argentino, aunque tiene una visión realista del tema: "mientras me encuentre bien física y mentalmente voy a tener la ilusión de volver al equipo. Pero tampoco debo ser hipócrita y tengo que admitir que estoy un poco relegado. Pero hasta la última convocatoria antes del Mundial voy a mantener las esperanzas", aclaró.

El último mensaje fue para el hincha de River y apreció que si bien "siempre fue fiel, eso se potenció después de vivir algo atípico como el descenso. Y ahora Ramón Díaz generó una motivación distinta".

Finalmente y al empezar a avizorar su retorno al país, Demichelis señaló que el "fútbol argentino es más violento que el de España. Acá es mucho más limpio. El video postpartido también influye, porque se toma en cuenta, te delata y te suspenden. Allá eso no pasa", advirtió desde Málaga el defensor que quiere Ramón Díaz.


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Saviola: "Es tentador volver a River"

BUENOS AIRES -- Javier Saviola, hoy delantero del Málaga español con exitoso pasado en Barcelona y Real Madrid, manifestó que es "tentador volver a River", club en el que inició su carrera en primera división de la mano de Ramón Díaz.

"Volver a River es tentador. Voy a evaluarlo bien, pero si vuelvo a Argentina es para hacerlo en el club del que soy hincha", anticipó Saviola al "Superclásico" de Radio 9, a propósito de la visita que recibió hace dos semanas del vicepresidente "millonario" Diego Turnes.

"Lo que sí me dolió en este tiempo fue que después del Mundial de Alemania 2006 no me tuvieran en cuenta para la selección, porque siempre mantuve mi nivel. Esa situación me molestó, ya que creo que mi paso por el equipo nacional fue bueno", remarcó para no perder vigencia sobre otro tema que lo preocupa.

Sobre su buen presente personal y del equipo dirigido por Manuel Pellegrini, apuntó que en Málaga lo "trataron muy bien" y está "feliz por la campaña que se está haciendo en la liga española y la Champions League. Firmé por un año y cuando termine la temporada veré como sigo, porque quedo libre en junio".

"Me reuní con Turnes y mantuvimos una linda charla, muy extensa, en la que me manifestó la intención de la dirigencia de repatriar a todos aquellos que le dieron cosas al club en el pasado", comentó.

"Además de ser hincha es muy lindo que a uno le cuenten cosas de River estando tan lejos del país. Es que a mí no me gusta hablar con los medios, ni con los argentinos ni con los de ningún lado", avisó.

"La verdad es que estoy muy orgulloso y me siento muy feliz de la carrera que tuve en Europa, por los clubes que pasé y por los compañeros que tuve, como por ejemplo Ronaldinho en el `Barsa`. Y por supuesto siempre agradecido a River por haberme permitido lograr esto", reconoció.

"Y encima en el plano personal también estoy muy feliz porque mi esposa está embarazada de seis meses y vamos a tener una nena. Estoy con la expectativa de la llegada de mi primer hijo", confesó quien también luciera sus dotes goleadoras en el Mónaco francés y el Benfica portugués.

Brasil: Flamengo, Vasco, Fluminense, Botafogo (100% Carioca) Rio > Säo Paulo

MENGÃO BI DA AMÈRICA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RlVt8zJhXQ
NPato7
bruger
7. marts 2013 21:20
svar
anmeld

Sv: Sydamerikansk fodbold i Danmark - hvad mener I?

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