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Hasse1983
bruger
6. aug. 2019 13:08
svar
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

1. Brugernavn
Hasse1983

2. Top6
Liverpool
City
Tottenham
United
Arsenal
Chelsea

3. Nedrykkere
Aston Villa
Sheffield
Brighton

4. Topscorer
Salah

5. Assist
Mane

6. POY
Salah

7. Rødt kort
Gomez

8. Selvmål
Matip

Liverpool FC - Y.N.W.A

"The trouble with referees is that they know the rules, but they don´t know the game." Bill Shankly
ANFIELD_YNWA
bruger
6. aug. 2019 13:43
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

1. ANFIELD_YNWA

2. Top 6 -

Liverpool
Man City
Man United
Tottenham
Chelsea
Arsenal


3. Nedrykkere :


Sheffield
Norwich
Burnley



4. Topscorer for LFC i PL :

Salah


5. Flest assist for LFC i PL :

Mane

6. Player of the year for LFC :

Alisson

7. Første røde kort for LFC i PL :

Henderson

8. Første selvmål for LFC i PL

Gomez
Anfield: noun, a military stronghold.
D.B.R. ©
bruger
6. aug. 2019 13:52
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

1. D.B.R. ©
2. 1. Manchester City, 2. Liverpool, 3. Tottenham, 4. Manchester U., 5. Arsenal, 6. West Ham
3. De 3 nedrykker : Newcastle, Sheffield U. og Norwich
4. Topscorer for LFC i PL : Mo Salah
5. Flest assist for LFC i PL : Andy Robertson
6. Player of the year for LFC : Virgil
7. Første røde kort for LFC i PL : Shaq
8. Første selvmål for LFC i PL: Matip
Y.N.W.A.
Let´s talk about SIX...
Thy87
bruger
6. aug. 2019 14:01
svar
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

1. Brugernavn
Thy87

2. Top6
Liverpool
City
Tottenham
Arsenal
Chelsea
Everton

3. Nedrykkere
Norwich
Sheffield
Brighton

4. Topscorer
Salah 

5. Assist
TAA

6. POY
Salah

7. Rødt kort
Fabinho

8. Selvmål
Matip
Liverpool FC - YNWA
Det er som jeg altid siger: Vi har for vaeret bagud.... og tabt! :-)
YNWA"96"
bruger
6. aug. 2019 15:09
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Jeg beklager, men jeg kan kun dele artiklen på denne måde. Det er fra den udvidede/opdateret udgave af Raphael Honingstein bog om Bossen. Men det er virkelig spændende læsning, 2 del kommer 15/8. Det er med Peter Krawietz.


´It was Van Dijk or no-one’. How Klopp and Krawietz’s transfers and tactics laid foundations for glory.

He is the man who has Jurgen Klopp’s ear, the man tasked with helping one of the best managers in the world outwit the opposition. Before the Champions League final in May, Liverpool’s assistant coach Peter Krawietz discussed tactical tweaks, the Philippe Coutinho deal and the impacts of Mohamed Salah and Virgil van Dijk with The Athletic.

Let’s turn back the clock. It’s the beginning of the 2017-18 season. What did you think Liverpool needed to do to develop further?
We had just worked really hard to finish fourth and considered that a big success. Now it was time to make it count and finish the job. We wanted to reach the Champions League group stage. That was the dominating consideration during pre-season. We wanted to make sure the team was functioning as soon as possible, as we needed to be sharp in the very first games. It helped us to a good start in the Premier League, but we struggled in September. We had been very busy in July, as we needed to juggle all the activities required by English clubs: The commercial stuff had to run alongside solid training sessions. It was a huge challenge. We tried to live like a football team under the most difficult conditions. It wasn’t easy during monsoon season in the Far East. It was also the time when Coutinho received an offer from Barcelona. It causes quite a commotion. Then Salah arrived. We knew he was a good player. But when we saw him during the first training sessions we said, “Whoa, what is this?”

And we passed the Hoffenheim test (in the Champions League qualifiers). To do that in an away game, against a well-rehearsed side, this early in the season was quite solid. But we knew we could do even better at home. At that time, we had already tried to sign Van Dijk. Of course he was our target, but it became clear at the end of the transfer window that we couldn’t make it happen. We wanted to become more stable and find the right balance ahead of every match. To build on the foundation we already had. We never forgot the sort of situations that had led to us not being successful in the previous season. Above all, we needed to become more consistent, in terms of our style of defending and keeping the ball. We wanted to improve our attacking game: tempo, transitions and control.

We realised how unbelievably fast Salah was and thought a lot about ways to bring his strengths to bear on the pitch. In order to get the most out of his ability to go deep, we needed to move beyond the classic, random counter-attacking situation and instead prepare situations for him systematically.

What did you do to get the most out of Salah?
We could talk about that for an hour. You can structurally reduce the attacking game to two or three typical situations.
Assuming the opponent has the ball, we need to talk about active defending. This doesn’t mean protecting your own goal, but trying to create situations in which you can win the ball. In the back of your head, you always want to exploit these situations, be it high up or in the middle of the pitch. Once you win the ball, automated procedures kick in: If you defend systematically, you know where your team-mates are.

You can then steer the opponent’s build-up in the direction you want them to. You are setting up situations you will have crafted during the preparation for the match. You know how the opponent is building up and you know whether they are taking the full backs forward or not.

Is it more difficult to create openings when you’re the ones in possession?
So, the opponent has taken a shot on goal and the ball is now at your keeper’s feet. “Alright, friends — time to play football.” There are various possibilities and they are all dependent on the opponent.
One of them is via a constructive build-up. You keep the first pass short and then start combining in order to advance up the pitch. If the opponent is trying to interfere, he needs to commit players forward. In that case, the first impulse is to play a long ball and to identify a situation when you need to accelerate the game. You can take advantage of that and you can play some killer balls forward. You are trying to get behind the last line of defence.

But you also have a different scenario. Say the opponent is well organised and is setting up rather deep, in or around the penalty box. Your task now is to find ways and means to play through this formation. This is about controlling the match, as well. You need to find the right moment when to speed things up. Even if there is not much space, you want to play the ball in behind the last line of defence. At first, you are playing through the centre, but a bit further up. It will work on the wings as well. Once you have accomplished that, you can position yourself in front of goal in such a way that you will become dangerous – with a pass or a cross.

Roughly speaking, those are the three situations.

These things come up when preparing for a match, but on the other hand, it is also a continuous process during training. All the things you saw during the match analysis you feel you will encounter on the weekend. Which will be the main tasks for us? Which solutions can we come up with? Ideally, you can use the lessons learned for future matches as well, in case there’s a similar situation for which they are needed.

Those are the systematic processes which come up during a season. For years, they have given our team the opportunity to become a rehearsed unit. Always improve, always take new variations on board. You are trying to learn about individual skills and you are also trying to create individual steps in order to facilitate development. Remember what is your strength in this situation? Keep it and use it when needed. That is the path we would describe as development.

Are we talking about procedures rather than actual choreographies?
Nothing happens independently of the opponent. Every opponent has their unique formation. They might be similar in their organisational form, but they always have individual characteristics. A team defending deep does not equal another team defending deep. The approach to solving the problem may be similar from time to time, but it is never identical.
This is an area we have really developed in. Our team is incredibly observant. We try to show them things and then try to prepare accordingly, via video analysis and in combination with training. You just need to give the lads a little hint, and they will see it. They also remember previous situations and solutions to a problem. That’s why they’re later able to implement these things at the highest tempo and under big pressure on the pitch. It is the highest form of collaboration.
Is that what gets you on your feet in the technical area?

It’s either that or because you score that massively important goal, like a 1-0 in the 95th minute. That’s certainly one way of provoking an explosion. But, yes, it can also happen because you are standing there and thinking, ‘Oh, that’s what we have been working on for one week. It’s exactly what we told them and how we wanted it done!’ They are making it happen in this situation and under huge stress. What more can you ask for?

Let’s go back to Van Dijk. You really wanted to sign him, and there was no Plan B. But did you underestimate your goalkeeping situation at the time?

This is not a PlayStation game. We can’t design our own players or buy them with virtual currency. It comes down to the budget and the available options. Who’s on the market and for how much? And you still have to compare them to the players already in the squad. If £40million won’t buy you a noticeable improvement, if we don’t see how that guy will lift up our performances to the next level, Jurgen will never do it. He won’t spend for the sake of spending.

We had made up our mind that it would be Van Dijk or no one. There was no keeper on the market that would have made a real difference to us, as I recall. We’d make the same decision again today.
You have to consider all of this, but perhaps the thinking in England is a little different in that respect. Spend, spend, spend. It’s all down to what you do in the transfer market. That may even be true, to some extent. On the other hand, we still believe in the possibility of developing a player, through training and systematic routines.

You started that season with Simon Mignolet, and finished with Loris Karius, who did quite well overall in the final months. But in hindsight, was it a mistake?
I tried to explain that before. It’s always a question of options and budget. Liverpool are a club whose owners adhere to economic principles. And at that specific time, having made all the considerations, there were no options for us.

At the same time, people on the outside are saying about Klopp: Doesn’t he see the need to make improvements? Is he stubborn? Why is he not spending the money?
The external view… People are free to draw their own conclusions. There will always be people who think the manager is somehow stupid. If that’s how you feel – no problem. But we cannot be influenced by that.

It is true that we support our players. They have to fight for their place – internally it is a massive competition for the starting spots – but you won’t find Jurgen throwing someone under the bus. It’s also true that we believe in players’ ability to develop positively, up to a point, thanks to coaching and systematic work.

In the September, there was a spell when it seemed like you couldn’t finish off games. You lost control in quite a few matches, conceded a lot of goals and the mood took a dip…
Manchester City, 5-0. Until Sadio Mane’s red card, we had played a really good game and had created a lot of chances. Then we fell behind. Totally unnecessary. Against Burnley, we drew 1-1 even though we were massively superior to them. Their keeper did an unbelievable job, we had players through on goal maybe 25 times. Then 1-1 against Manchester United. But it never felt like a crisis to me. We did a solid job away to Spartak Moscow, although it wasn’t a great match from us. We still should have won, however.

You also threw away victory against Sevilla…
Sevilla were incredibly clever. They scored the 2-2 equaliser just minutes before the end, with a quick throw-in, that was sensationally well done. These are normal results, they can happen. We are ambitious and like to win football matches, but it’s all part of a development process.

If I look at what’s happened in Bundesliga and Bundesliga 2 this year, the coaches there are treated without any respect. It is an incredibly unpleasant and bad development. What I am trying to say is: You look at the results and say ‘That’s not good’. But besides the result, you also have to observe what’s happening on the pitch. How did this result come about? What was the level of football like? You can draw 1-1 and it can be awful, but other times you may say: In fairness, that was a great game, we just failed to score another goal from the five chances we had.

If you get three lucky wins in a row, that’s nine points on the board. The chance of that happening again is not particularly high. For us, this is the basis for assessment. What did our performance look like? Was it reflected in the result? How was our approach? Did we make any mistakes in defence? Did we play poor football? If yes, why?

In those situations, we just put our heads down in order to keep working and developing. It needs time. And some coaches are not granted this time. How can development take place if setbacks are no longer allowed? Development always means overcoming obstacles and everybody encounters problems of some sort. In football, it can happen from one second to the next. A red card and two injuries will mean that you have to adapt. When there are many matches in short succession, it may not be possible to find a fix right away. It requires work, time and understanding.

I do not want to pass judgement on clubs who have sacked their coaches, but the current environment is preventing coaches from developing. Jurgen had spells in Mainz when he lost seven matches in a row. But the club left him alone, regardless. They realised he was tightening the right screws and saw the true potential of the team. They didn’t create an environment of pressure, which can be very detrimental.

You were never subjected to this kind of pressure?
It’s been our good fortune, Jurgen’s good fortune, that he’s always had people behind him – at Mainz, Dortmund and now at Liverpool – who trust him. They trust him because they recognise that (good) things are happening independently of results, that methodical work is being done using all available resources. What follows on from that is a degree of patience and optimism. That way, you can navigate difficult situations.

On Jurgen’s second-year anniversary in the job, you were thrashed 4-1 by Tottenham…
Before (that game), we had an outstanding and vital match against Maribor. “OK, Maribor?!” you say. Winning a Champions League away match 7-0 is nothing to sneer at. But when you are playing on Wednesdays and Sundays and you have all this travel in between, it is hard to train. Travelling back from Slovenia, we hadn’t managed to be totally fit and ready for Tottenham. Especially mentally. We could have been down 3-0 or 4-0 after 20 minutes. But if you look closely, we managed to flip the switch in that match already. The match was a lost cause and we conceded two more goals after free kicks, but we played dominant football in the last hour. Perhaps nobody remembers that, but we created a lot of chances.

And that stopped you worrying there were serious problems?
Exactly. We had a few talks and agreed that some things which happened needed to be avoided going forward. You can’t win 7-0 on a Wednesday and concede four times on the weekend. The opponent delivered some great counterattacks, yes. But on the whole, it simply wasn’t enough from us. This can’t happen.

Was this an important moment for the team’s mentality?
In every season and for every team, there are key moments. This was one of them. It’s one thing to approach players and tell them what’s wrong. The key is that they themselves realise it at the same time and then are willing to use these pointers to truly make amends. This team’s great quality over the years has been to do just that.

What do you remember about that crazy second match against Sevilla, the 3-3?
That was a special situation, because we were leading 3-0. I remember it well. Going into the match, we had practised these outstanding corner kicks and they worked really well. We led 2-0, but we weren’t defending well as a team. We needed one point to progress to the knockout rounds and we had a home match to spare. It was a tight group and everything was still up for grabs. We learned a lot from that game and you can say we were not at our best there. In the closing stages, we picked ourselves up and played a bit better.

Did you think it was a mental problem, or perhaps more down to the fact that (prior to Van Dijk signing) you were short of a big, solid player in defence?
On one hand, of course it is a mental issue. But it is also about how to handle yourself in such a situation. How do I apply the brakes in order to turn this around? Which style of play do I use, ideally? When you look for answers, you quickly get into topics like control, cleverness and possession. Counterattacks alone are not the solution. Just kicking a long ball for forwards to run after it won’t do it. You don’t want to be chasing after a ball for two minutes straight. But it was a process of maturity that we were going through at that time.

Approaching the winter break, the Coutinho issue came back with full force. Were you confident you could compensate for losing him?
It was a really tricky situation. You don’t want to lose a world-class player. You need to think about whether there is a solution to the problem, or if you are losing about 50 per cent of your quality in the process. We knew our squad well enough and felt that we could be stable even if we lost a player with such special qualities.

In Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain, you had someone who could play that role…
It’s a view many people seem to have. One player leaves the club and the question is raised: Who will take on his role? Please, name two players who can play like Coutinho…

OK. Let’s say the Ox could play his position, not his role…
It’s a matter of how you interpret the position. We felt he had two positions Coutinho could play for us: on the left wing or in attacking midfield. But we had other players and playing styles that allowed us to be successful, and this is where we found the answer. We have Sadio and other central midfielders who can interpret these positions differently. This realisation came at the end of a six-month process. It was a painful decision. But we said, ‘Let’s make the best out of it. Let’s create more confidence and put the responsibility on the shoulders of players that are still here.’

Adding a third central midfielder and moving Sadio to the left worked out well because it gave the three forwards more protection. Absolutely. But it is also about finding the right mix. Phil had shouldered an incredible amount of responsibility for our game in possession. When we were in control of the ball, he was the man with the crucial ideas. He was the guy who smashed in free kicks and so on. We all knew how tough it would be to replace him.

There were a lot of people wondering why you didn’t buy a replacement in January…
We thought about a lot of things ourselves. I get why some would have thought that way. When making a decision, there are many discussions and various ideas are taken into account. And in the end, you find a different solution, especially as the financial means are not limitless. You have to consider carefully whether you want to get someone else on board. If you can’t, you do it differently. That can work, too.

Then Van Dijk finally arrived and certainly made a difference…
He has natural qualities on an astonishing level, as far as a centre back is concerned. His stature, technical ability on the ball, his game intelligence, pace – it’s a combination that’s extremely rare. And his character: He’s a winner, a commander. He makes those next to him better. He organises, he provides calmness and safety. Others can grow next to him. That’s what he had hoped for. These hopes were met.
"Some people believe football is a matter of life and death. I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that."
Bill Shankly
YNWA"96"
bruger
6. aug. 2019 17:21
svar
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

James Pearce til Athletic, lidt af et drømmehold af journalister de er ved at samle.

https://t.co/dD6svFE1nA?amp=1

#LFC and Bournemouth are in talks over a loan fee for Harry Wilson. No obligation to buy. Deal not certain, but very likely to happen. Reds want assurances he will play.

Leeds haven´t come close to submitting an offer the club would consider for Ryan Kent, valued at £10m.

Melissa Reddy
@MelissaReddy_
·
2 t
Harry Wilson is on his way to Bournemouth for a medical.

Further offers anticipated from Leeds for Ryan Kent. #LFC would want a sell-on clause included in a deal for him.

"Some people believe football is a matter of life and death. I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that."
Bill Shankly
Hasse1983
bruger
6. aug. 2019 17:51
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Shit en post YNWA haha... læste kun de første 4-5 afsnit, men allerede der ser vi forskellen på, hvem en klub vil købe og hvem fans mener er helt perfekte til holdet;)

Glæder mig til at læse den færdig.

Er der en præmie til vinderen af gættekonkurrence ?
Liverpool FC - Y.N.W.A

"The trouble with referees is that they know the rules, but they don´t know the game." Bill Shankly
YNWA"96"
bruger
6. aug. 2019 18:20
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Ja vild god artikel. Jeg har Athletic app, jeg har haft den et års tid, fordi Melissa pigen skrev nogle artikler for dem sidste år. Jeg har vidst 2-3 gratis artikler om måneden, som jeg liger husker aftalen. Men de er godt nok ved, at samle de tunge journalister der. Lidt mere spændende at læse dybdegående artikler end alt det clickbait shit...:) Men jeg kunne ikke rigtig kopiere artiklen, derfor måtte jeg ud i at kopiere teksten, beklager.


Jep jeg udlover selvfølgelig en gave til vinderen ! ...:)
"Some people believe football is a matter of life and death. I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that."
Bill Shankly
Gino77
bruger
6. aug. 2019 18:46
svar
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

1. Gino77

2.
1-Liverpool
2- City
3- Chelsea
4.Wolwes
5.Arsenal
6.Tottenham



3. De 3 nedrykker :Sheffield U , Brighton , Burnley

Man får 10 point for hver rigtig nedrykker man har rigtig. Rækkefølge er altså ligegyldigt her !

4. Topscorer for LFC i PL :Salah

10 point for rigtig svar

5. Flest assist for LFC i PL : Keita

10 point for rigtig svar.

6. Player of the year for LFC : VVD

15 point for rigtig svar.

7. Første røde kort for LFC i PL :Keita

Rigtig svar 15 point

8. Første selvmål for LFC i PL : Robertson

Rigtig svar 15 point

Fenerbahce,Brøndby,Liverpool




AHUJ
bruger
7. aug. 2019 07:21
svar
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Så er ESPNs luck index kommet frem, og på trods af, at mange modstander fans har skreget op omkring vores held hele sidste sæson, så var vi marginalt Uheldige.

https://www.espnluckindex.com/adjusted-tables/
"He´s our centre half, He´s our number 4
Watch him defend, And we watch him score
He´ll pass the ball, Calm as you like
He´s Virgil van Dijk
He´s Virgil van Dijk"

Dette indlæg er blevet rettet 7. aug. 2019 07:28 af AHUJ

Klubsnak | LIVERPOOL F.C. - Champions of the World

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