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D.B.R. ©
bruger
10. aug. 2019 23:40
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Okay, takker.
Y.N.W.A.
CHAMPIONS!
Hasse1983
bruger
11. aug. 2019 07:07
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Forstår jeg det rigtigt, som Pep blot bad De Bruyne fake en skade, som dommeren stoppede spillet for, selvom Liverpool var på bolden?
- i så fald er det røv usportsligt, men det er ikke noget jeg ligger søvnløs over.

Jeg synes der er andre usportslige ting der er være end det. Og så er det jo dommeren der fejler, hvis han stopper spillet.
Liverpool FC - Y.N.W.A

"The trouble with referees is that they know the rules, but they don´t know the game." Bill Shankly
Jesse Pinkman
bruger
11. aug. 2019 07:41
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

https://theathletic.co.uk/1119871/2019/08/08/he-produced-some-real-bits-of-magic-on-the-ball-lifelong-red-harvey-elliott-has-made-a-strong-start-at-liverpool/#_=_
"There’s a real swagger to Elliott. He shows composure and technique beyond his years.

That was perfectly illustrated by his equaliser just before the break after some slack defending had enabled Oldham to strike twice following Neco Williams’ stunning opener.

The impressive Curtis Jones picked out Elliott, who darted forward and then intelligently played it back into his team-mate’s path.

Jones’ low strike was parried and Elliott pounced. Rather than snatch at the rebound, he coolly waited for the keeper to commit himself and nonchalantly rolled the ball home before pointing to the heavens in celebration. He was off the mark.

In the second half Elliott was at the heart of everything best about Liverpool Under 21s as he showcased his eye for a pass and was a creative force.

It had been pre-agreed with Klopp that he would be given a breather for the final quarter and the visitors sorely missed his presence late on as Jamie Stott’s header consigned them to a 3-2 defeat.

Liverpool Under 21s boss Neil Critchley told The Athletic: “That was my first real look at Harvey close up and I liked what I saw.

“He really showed what he’s all about. He produced some real bits of magic on the ball tonight and was so composed with how he took his goal.

“He could have easily hit it over the bar or straight back at the goalkeeper. It was a lovely bit of calm play in front of the goal.”"

Fulham vil have £10m for ham og Edwards betragter handlen som et kup! Så er der ikke mangel på forventninger!
Klopp: "Mo Salah, world class, but not every day. Sadio Mane, world class, but not every day. Roberto Firmino, world class, pretty much every day,"
kanmandet
bruger
11. aug. 2019 08:07
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Alt tyder på at Klopp henter Andy Lonergan ind efter Alissons skade. Så ville det være fint at lade ham starte træningskampen mod Chelsea på onsdag. Og lad så for guds skyld være med at tage stjernerne med til Tyrkiet.
Lutter reserver til den kamp så alle kan være klar til den svære kamp ude mod Saints i weekenden.
Champions of England.
Champions of Europe.
Champions of the World.
Champions of fucking everything.
Jesse Pinkman
bruger
11. aug. 2019 08:46
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Og lad så for guds skyld være med at tage stjernerne med til Tyrkiet.


https://twitter.com/VirgilvDijk/status/1160116376838844416

"3 big points to the start the season with! Lots to continue to work on but we have a great platform to build on now. See you all in Istanbul!"

Jeg ville ikke regne med det..
Klopp: "Mo Salah, world class, but not every day. Sadio Mane, world class, but not every day. Roberto Firmino, world class, pretty much every day,"
YNWA"96"
bruger
11. aug. 2019 11:05
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Mon ikke både Klopp og Lambert stiller med en del spillere fra “B-kæden” på onsdag. Begge hold har 3 kampe på en uge, så vil være overraskende, hvis der ikke bliver roteret en del til kampen på onsdag. Spillerne fra bænken mod Norwich, tror jeg alle vil starte inde på onsdag, altså Matip - Milner - Keita - Ox - Mane og Shaq.

@jesse

Vi har jo været der før. Med ex. Ings endte det med £8 M + Burnley fik 20% i videresalgsklausul. Det er helt rimeligt, at ex.Fulham får et “pænt” beløb for Elliott.
“Some people believe football is a matter of life and death, I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that.”
Bill Shankly

Dette indlæg er blevet rettet 11. aug. 2019 11:45 af YNWA"96"
Jesse Pinkman
bruger
11. aug. 2019 11:50
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Vi var der så sent som med Solanke.

Jeg er på ingen måde forarget over prisen. Men klubben søger det halve. Ender nok på 7-9m hvilket stadig er et røverkøb, selvom det egentlig bare var hans "schoolboy contract" der udløb. Født LFC fan og vi har ikke haft noget i nærheden af så stort et wing-talent, siden Sterling. Så det er svært at få armene ned, hvis man elsker at se unge spillere udvikle sig selv i klubben, for så at bryde igennem på 1. holdet.

Hvis alt går vel, så sidder vi om 2-4 sæsoner og griner af os selv over, at vi "ikke hentede nogen" den sommer.

Edit: Jeg tror omvendt at truppen er tændt på et trofæ. Charity Shield var mindre, og der så vi også en del tænding, da de først kom igang.
Klopp: "Mo Salah, world class, but not every day. Sadio Mane, world class, but not every day. Roberto Firmino, world class, pretty much every day,"

Dette indlæg er blevet rettet 11. aug. 2019 11:54 af Jesse Pinkman
YNWA"96"
bruger
11. aug. 2019 12:18
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Han var i Madrid (Real) og se på forholdene denne sommer, så ja han bliver spændende at følge !

Jeg beklager, at jeg deler den på denne måde. Men hold nu kæft en god artikel fra Simon Hughes :

The long Road...to Anfield

“One-way ticket to Freshfield please.” Not something they hear too often at the Merseyrail kiosk in Crosby. The attendant raises an eye so I explain what I’m doing. I’m walking from Jurgen Klopp’s house to Anfield on the opening day of the Premier League season like it’s the most natural pursuit in the world. That’s 14 miles. Kick-off is still ten hours away but I plan to travel slowly. The attendant still has that look on his face. His name is Brian. He’s an Evertonian.

The subsequent train journey takes seven or eight minutes. It is warm but there is driving rain outside and through steamy windows, travelling north from Liverpool, there are woods, farms, flat fields, Hightown, more of the same, Formby and, indeed, Freshfield.

Land Registry data names the road I’m walking down as the most expensive in Merseyside. It leads from the station two ways, longer than you’d imagine a Millionaire’s Row to be. At a crossroads, the canopy of green above opens up before closing again and the remainder of the boulevard becomes unadopted and unpredictable, filled with large pools of water. Only the top floor of Klopp’s home, where he lives with his wife Ulla, is visible because of the size of the wall protecting it. The property doesn’t seem to be the biggest but looks can be deceiving.

What can be gleaned from the type of place and the type of area a Liverpool manager chooses to live? Each one is judged by the example set by Bill Shankly, whose house on Bellefield Drive backed on to not Liverpool’s Melwood training ground in West Derby but the one belonging to Everton. (Though Melwood was also just down the road). His neighbour was Dougie Rose, Bellefield’s groundsman who often had to tell Shankly to stop walking his dog on the pitches where they often left their mark. “If Everton were playing at the bottom of my garden,” Shankly said once, “I’d shut the curtains.” Only that wasn’t strictly true. Though he liked West Derby, he was a particularly bad driver as well as a nervous traveller. Being near Melwood not only allowed him to be closer to the point of his obsession but also gave him a sort of hold over his team’s closest rivals. “There was always a feeling Bill was watching us,” Rose admitted. “It was like he had some control at Bellefield as well as Melwood.”

While Bob Paisley moved to Woolton, the parish of Liverpool’s southern end where the Beatles met at a church fete, Kenny Dalglish bought a house in Birkdale after joining from Celtic in 1977 and he has never left. Closer to Southport than Freshfield, Birkdale was the chosen address for Liverpool players before Dalglish transitioned from player to player-manager and then to manager, when other players started moving out. They liked Dalglish but he was ultimately their manager in an era where drinking was considered just fine at the right times. By the end of the 1980s many of them had decamped to Wirral, the peninsula across the Mersey river.

“Kenny couldn’t always know what we were up to,” admitted Bruce Grobbelaar, the goalkeeper whose background in Zimbabwe explained why he, as more of an outdoors sort of person, bought a cottage near Wrexham in northern Wales upon joining Liverpool from Vancouver Whitecaps. He had been ordered by Paisley to move closer to Liverpool and though he changed homes regularly in the following decade, he avoided Birkdale because of the presence of Dalglish. This was an era where footballers were afforded the sort of social freedoms they do not have now and this explains why Liverpool’s current stars do not seem to have a problem with living near their manager.

When Klopp was appointed in 2015, Adam Lallana lived across the road and captain Jordan Henderson wasn’t far away. Some mornings, when Klopp was putting the rubbish out, he’d look up and Lallana’s son Arthur would be on the landing mimicking the German, making fist pumps. Lallana and Henderson – whose friendship is as close as any in the Liverpool squad – have since relocated to Cheshire, apparently due to the supposed increased level of primary school options in the area. New signings have since replaced them as neighbours.

In an environment where every car looks like it could be owned by a footballer, Klopp drives a modest-looking Opel. Though this is because of a commercial agreement with the German manufacturer it is reflective of Klopp’s character that he could have chosen higher-end brands and picked something he thought fitted his own image.

Weirdly, as I turn the corner which takes me around the corner and towards the Freshfield pub where Klopp sometimes drinks, Andy Robertson navigates his Range Rover through the puddles. The Scotland left back might be one of Klopp’s neighbours – along with assistant manager Peter Krawietz – but he is not the closest. That is Naby Keita, who lives next door. The Guinea midfielder has adjusted slowly to English football following his arrival last summer from RB Leipzig but Klopp has tried to help his integration by encouraging Robertson to share lifts with him to Melwood despite language difficulties.

Approaching the Freshfield pub (below), or the Freshie, as it is known locally, I am told that I’ve just missed Sadio Mane driving past, the Senegal forward who apparently lets his letterbox fill to the extent postal staff have to empty it for him, sometimes throwing mail over his front wall to create space. “You don’t see much of the players – they keep themselves to themselves,” a Freshfield resident tells me. They understand the bubble of this land, which affords the sort of privacy demanded by people in the public eye. Some of the mansions, I realise, are more like compounds with their own workforces.

Klopp has been known, however, to enter the Monday night quiz at the Freshie. A Liverpool fan tucking into his breakfast tells me he has seen him here before. “Doesn’t make a big scene, just sits in the corner occasionally with members of his coaching staff,” he says. “Nobody really bothers him – I guess that’s why he comes back.” At the beginning of his time at Liverpool, he went in alone one night and asked politely if he could join a quiz team. The story has gained legs over the intervening years and the fella munching through his breakfast describes a scene where Klopp was at the bar getting the next round in, though he doesn’t know for certain because he wasn’t there and appreciates stories like these are embellished. “I’m tempted to believe it, though,” he stressed, “because an Evertonian told me. They seem to like him.”

Howard Kendall, the last Everton manager to win a league title, had been one of the pub’s most famous clients. In a previous working life, I had helped him from my car and back through the doors of the bungalow where he had long lived with his wife, Lil. That was in Formby, where I then headed south for 20 minutes until I reached the path towards Hightown. It was there I saw the first sight of Liverpool in the distance, reminding me that though many Liverpudlians live in Formby and Freshfield, both are separate places: a sort of inbetween world before Ainsdale, Birkdale and Southport arrives, where not only the accent lurches towards more of a quasi-Lancastrian burr but also the political preference switches from reliably centre of left to right of centre.

The blue transporter cranes of Seaforth were nearly nine miles away but shining now because the clouds had lifted giving clear views of the road ahead. Later in the day, Klopp would take a more direct route to Anfield where it is possible to be there in half an hour from Freshfield depending on traffic. But for the intervention of lunch, my journey by foot would take up the rest of the day.

Through yellow fields, Hightown became Blundellsands before Blundellsands became Crosby and then Waterloo, leading along a coastal path beyond Anthony Gormley’s Iron Men and eventually, Beach Lawn. The grand Georgian homes on this terrace looked out still to the Irish Sea, reminding where Liverpool’s business once lay as a city which looked away from the city for economic solutions. There was a blue plaque on a wall of the house (below) where Bruce Ismay was born, whose father Thomas founded the White Star Line in 1867. Forty-five years later, as the chairman of the shipping company that built the Titanic, Bruce was the highest-ranking official who survived its sinking and spent the rest of his life being reminded of his cowardice.

The sight of those blue cranes in Seaforth were becoming closer and these explained much of Liverpool’s more recent past as a port unable to keep up with the rapid increase in the size of ships in the second part of the 20th century. This meant a dock relocation from the city centre to the mouth of the Mersey where it oozes into the deeper waters of the Irish Sea, affording the space for bigger containers.

Growing up in Bootle, Jamie Carragher could see those cranes at the end of Marsh Lane. Though geography does not widely play a role in sporting allegiance in Liverpool, Bootle is one of the few distinguishable areas where traditionally there are more Evertonians – though it is impossible to explain exactly why. The Carraghers were one of those families and one of their favourite pubs was The Chaucer, where Jamie, then 20 years old, went for a pint after Liverpool lost in the FA Cup to Manchester United in 1999 following two late goals. Carragher was a self-confessed Evertonian until that day, looking out for their results as soon as he’d finished playing for Liverpool. The Chaucer, though, was in no mood to understand his professional anguish that Sunday night and having received so much stick, he realised that to really succeed at Liverpool he needed to believe in Liverpool. His father Philly was a rabid Evertonian, one of the biggest in Bootle – someone who once ran on the pitch at Wembley to celebrate a victory. This was now considered the past. Carragher subsequently played more games for Liverpool than any other player aside from Ian Callaghan. He is one of 13 footballers from Bootle to represent Liverpool’s first team. That’s one Bootleian for every decade of the club’s existence. They are due another one.

At Lambeth Road it is nearly 4pm and shirt-wearing fans are disgorging from rail carriages at Sandhills. Sheets of rain wash in from the Irish Sea, forcing them to huddle underneath bus stops. This is not the way a football season is supposed to start. In the wait, Anfield’s new Main Stand looms above. It has been dismissed by those who don’t support Liverpool as a giant stapler. Yet it stands on a ridge above the city like a machine beast, making everything else seem a lot smaller. You think it is near but because of the gradient leading up towards it, it’s actually much further away even when it seems close.

The discussions about the stadium’s redevelopment began at the start of the 1990s. Norwich City, the visitors on the opening Friday of this Premier League season, were the opponents on the final day of the Kop terrace before it was demolished in 1994 and replaced by an all-seater grandstand. Jeremy Goss spoilt that celebration, securing a 1-0 victory for his side. Despite the defeat, it had seemed then that Liverpool were moving forward again, but in reality the club was struggling to keep up with the pace of Manchester United where the vast revenues of the newly formed Premier League were being invested in the ground and the size of Old Trafford increased dramatically. Liverpool’s greatest rivals had, as chief executive Peter Robinson once feared, “got their act together”, and suddenly Liverpool were being left behind.

The inability for Liverpool to expand meant Anfield’s surrounding area, already suffering, suffered some more. The decisions of current owners Fenway Sports Group are always under the microscope but their call to redevelop rather than relocate has arguably been the most important they’ve made in a social sense because Anfield the area now knows where the future lies and at least it can try to plan. For years, many of the terraced houses in the surrounding streets were steel shuttered. The club had bought some of the properties in an attempt to move people out but many wanted to stay. Liverpool’s financial limitations and the lack of support locally helped neither the club nor its neighbours and a rot set in. “‘I don’t think Liverpool FC handled that issue or the period particularly well,” Steve Rotheram, the Liverpool-supporting metro mayor of the region told me. “The community was concerned that something was being done to them and this brought a sense of hopelessness. Liverpool has a responsibility beyond facilities, players and corporate guests. The new stand looks fantastic and now the area is catching up.”

Anfield is neater but a struggle remains. Ian Byrne from the Fans Supporting Foodbank campaign parks his van behind the Anfield Road stand three hours before every home game and works in tandem with Dave Kelly from the Everton fan group, Blue Union, promoting the mantra, “Hunger Doesn’t Wear Club Colours”. The Joseph Rowntree Foundation, which measures child poverty, estimates levels in Anfield and Walton, where Everton are based, are among the worst in the country. Both Merseyside clubs have been hugely supportive of the joint campaign but Byrne recognises there is only so much football can do without changes in parliament.

On match days, Anfield appears to thrive. The mass of humanity that lands upon the neighbourhood contrasts with the rest of the week when some businesses close. This is not Freshfield or Formby, but that does not mean Klopp lives an entirely separate life even though by his own admission he rarely sees urban Liverpool because the appetite to welcome him is overwhelming. It is Liverpool’s first home game since they became European champions for a sixth time in June but Klopp insists the trophy won’t be paraded before Anfield because of the requirement for a renewed focus. His team’s football is relatable to Liverpool people because it reflects them, perhaps better than any other since the glory days of the 1980s. “It’s because they’re always on the front foot,” one stall trader tells me as I finally make it to the ground having walked all day to reach it. Inside 28 minutes, Liverpool would accelerate into a 3-0 lead over Norwich, winning 4-1 in the end without really getting into a second gear. That to me seemed like a neat way of illustrating how this team really is.


“Some people believe football is a matter of life and death, I am very disappointed with that attitude. I can assure you it is much, much more important than that.”
Bill Shankly
kanmandet
bruger
11. aug. 2019 14:33
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Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Der ville da være fedt at se spillere som Brewster, Elliott, Ox og Curtis Jones i aktion i sådan en kamp på onsdag, selvom det sker nok ikke.
Champions of England.
Champions of Europe.
Champions of the World.
Champions of fucking everything.
Sule12
bruger
11. aug. 2019 19:10
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anmeld

Sv: LIVERPOOL F.C. - * * * * * *

Det var vist meget fint jeg fik skrevet Chelsea ud af min top 6. Vi bør kunne slå dem med reserverne.

Klubsnak | LIVERPOOL F.C. - CHAMPIONS

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